usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

todaysdocument:

Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens: Part 1 – A Challenge to Democracy

Americanism … loses much of its meaning in the confines of a Relocation Center.

A Challenge to Democracy (1943)

February 19, 2017, is the 75th Anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066. Issued in 1942, soon after the United States’ entry into the Second World War, EO 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded” and “provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary … to accomplish the purpose of this order.”

Though the text of EO 9066 does not contain the word “Japanese,” the intent and effect was the creation of a sweeping program to remove 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes in coastal California, Oregon, and Washington State in the name of national security. Though the language of the time called this an “evacuation” or “mass migration,” those affected were forced to leave their communities as the Federal government moved them to heavily-guarded camps in isolated areas hundreds of miles away.

The Film Record

The newly-created War Relocation Authority (WRA) heavily documented the government’s program of Japanese American incarceration from 1942 through 1945, so we have many opportunities to understand how the camps looked, how they were laid out, and what the Federal government said about them.

The WRA collaborated with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the Office of War Information (OWI), the War Department, and the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry to make films intended for several different audiences. The films are most definitely propaganda, but they reveal points of tension between the actions of the government and the democratic ideals the nation was fighting a war to defend.

A Challenge to Democracy

A Challenge to Democracy was produced by the WRA with the cooperation of the OWI and OSS. It is the most comprehensive United States government propaganda film about the Japanese American internment and relocation program. The narrator states that what we are witnessing is “evacuation” of Japanese Americans to “wartime communities” or “relocation centers” and insists that “they are not prisoners, they are not internees.” The images in the film tell a different story.

At one point, the narrator states “relocation centers are not normal and probably never can be.” In fact, the government’s longer-term plan was to move the Japanese Americans deemed loyal into towns and cities in the interior of the United States. A Challenge to Democracy likely was directed towards the Caucasian residents of these communities in an attempt to make them more accepting of displaced Japanese Americans. 

More via Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens | The Unwritten Record


Explore more resources from @usnatarchives​ on Japanese American Internment and Executive Order 9066:

todaysdocument:

Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens: Part 1 – A Challenge to Democracy

Americanism … loses much of its meaning in the confines of a Relocation Center.

A Challenge to Democracy (1943)

February 19, 2017, is the 75th Anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066. Issued in 1942, soon after the United States’ entry into the Second World War, EO 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded” and “provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary … to accomplish the purpose of this order.”

Though the text of EO 9066 does not contain the word “Japanese,” the intent and effect was the creation of a sweeping program to remove 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes in coastal California, Oregon, and Washington State in the name of national security. Though the language of the time called this an “evacuation” or “mass migration,” those affected were forced to leave their communities as the Federal government moved them to heavily-guarded camps in isolated areas hundreds of miles away.

The Film Record

The newly-created War Relocation Authority (WRA) heavily documented the government’s program of Japanese American incarceration from 1942 through 1945, so we have many opportunities to understand how the camps looked, how they were laid out, and what the Federal government said about them.

The WRA collaborated with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the Office of War Information (OWI), the War Department, and the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry to make films intended for several different audiences. The films are most definitely propaganda, but they reveal points of tension between the actions of the government and the democratic ideals the nation was fighting a war to defend.

A Challenge to Democracy

A Challenge to Democracy was produced by the WRA with the cooperation of the OWI and OSS. It is the most comprehensive United States government propaganda film about the Japanese American internment and relocation program. The narrator states that what we are witnessing is “evacuation” of Japanese Americans to “wartime communities” or “relocation centers” and insists that “they are not prisoners, they are not internees.” The images in the film tell a different story.

At one point, the narrator states “relocation centers are not normal and probably never can be.” In fact, the government’s longer-term plan was to move the Japanese Americans deemed loyal into towns and cities in the interior of the United States. A Challenge to Democracy likely was directed towards the Caucasian residents of these communities in an attempt to make them more accepting of displaced Japanese Americans. 

More via Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens | The Unwritten Record


Explore more resources from @usnatarchives​ on Japanese American Internment and Executive Order 9066:

todaysdocument:

Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens, Part 2: Japanese Relocation

February 19, 2017, is the 75th Anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066. Issued in 1942, soon after the United States’ entry into the Second World War, EO 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded” and “provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary … to accomplish the purpose of this order.”

Though the text of EO 9066 does not contain the word “Japanese,” the intent and effect was the creation of a sweeping program to remove 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes in coastal California, Oregon, and Washington State in the name of national security. Though the language of the time called this an “evacuation” or “mass migration,” those affected were forced to leave their communities as the Federal government moved them to heavily-guarded camps in isolated areas hundreds of miles away.

The Film Record

The newly-created War Relocation Authority (WRA) heavily documented the government’s program of Japanese American incarceration from 1942 through 1945, so we have many opportunities to understand how the camps looked, how they were laid out, and what the Federal government said about them.

The WRA collaborated with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the Office of War Information (OWI), the War Department, and the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry to make films intended for several different audiences. The films are most definitely propaganda, but they reveal points of tension between the actions of the government and the democratic ideals the nation was fighting a war to defend.

Japanese Relocation

Japanese Relocation was produced by the OWI and distributed by the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry. Milton S. Eisenhower, director of the WRA for its first 90 days of existence, describes the film as a “historical record” of the operation to remove Japanese Americans from military areas. The film does provide a visual record of some of the economic devastation of EO 9066. We see vacant shops and businesses, and impounded fishing boats in California. The narrator notes that “the quick disposal of property often involved financial sacrifice” by Japanese Americans.

The intended audience for Japanese Relocation was not only Americans. Narration at the end of the film frames the government’s treatment of Japanese Americans as a standard to be followed by its enemies abroad and expresses hope that the “fundamental decency” of this American example “will influence the Axis powers in their treatment of Americans who fall into their hands.”

More via Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens | The Unwritten Record


Explore more resources from @usnatarchives​ on Japanese American Internment and Executive Order 9066:

todaysdocument:

Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens, Part 2: Japanese Relocation

February 19, 2017, is the 75th Anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066. Issued in 1942, soon after the United States’ entry into the Second World War, EO 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded” and “provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary … to accomplish the purpose of this order.”

Though the text of EO 9066 does not contain the word “Japanese,” the intent and effect was the creation of a sweeping program to remove 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes in coastal California, Oregon, and Washington State in the name of national security. Though the language of the time called this an “evacuation” or “mass migration,” those affected were forced to leave their communities as the Federal government moved them to heavily-guarded camps in isolated areas hundreds of miles away.

The Film Record

The newly-created War Relocation Authority (WRA) heavily documented the government’s program of Japanese American incarceration from 1942 through 1945, so we have many opportunities to understand how the camps looked, how they were laid out, and what the Federal government said about them.

The WRA collaborated with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the Office of War Information (OWI), the War Department, and the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry to make films intended for several different audiences. The films are most definitely propaganda, but they reveal points of tension between the actions of the government and the democratic ideals the nation was fighting a war to defend.

Japanese Relocation

Japanese Relocation was produced by the OWI and distributed by the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry. Milton S. Eisenhower, director of the WRA for its first 90 days of existence, describes the film as a “historical record” of the operation to remove Japanese Americans from military areas. The film does provide a visual record of some of the economic devastation of EO 9066. We see vacant shops and businesses, and impounded fishing boats in California. The narrator notes that “the quick disposal of property often involved financial sacrifice” by Japanese Americans.

The intended audience for Japanese Relocation was not only Americans. Narration at the end of the film frames the government’s treatment of Japanese Americans as a standard to be followed by its enemies abroad and expresses hope that the “fundamental decency” of this American example “will influence the Axis powers in their treatment of Americans who fall into their hands.”

More via Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens | The Unwritten Record


Explore more resources from @usnatarchives​ on Japanese American Internment and Executive Order 9066:

sfmoma:

SFMOMA is thrilled to partner with the San Francisco Film Society​ to present, Modern Cinema, a new film series unfolding over three weekends in October that includes films that haunt, the work of Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul​, and tales of horror and the supernatural. Tickets are on sale, so go take your pick

sfmoma.me/ModernCinema

nprfreshair:

It’s 3 a.m. and Whiskers has decided it’s time for breakfast. He jumps up on your bed, gently paws at your eyelids and meows to be fed. Annoyed? Cat behavior specialist Sarah Ellis says you have only yourself to blame.

Ellis says that cat owners reinforce negative behaviors when they give into them. “Cats are not necessarily born meowing and screaming at us for food, it’s a behavior that they learned,” Ellis tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross.

Instead of indulging Whiskers’ request for an early-morning snack, Ellis recommends adopting an “extinction schedule,” whereby you ignore the behavior entirely until it stops. If cat owners “can be really strong with that extinction schedule and just make sure at every occurrence of that behavior they do not reward it… it will stop,” Ellis says.

In her book, The Trainable Cat, Ellis and her co-author John Bradshaw describe how humans who understand basic feline nature can get their cats to come on command, take medicine and, yes, wait until morning for breakfast.

When it comes to encouraging the positive, Ellis recommends rewards over punishment — especially if the rewards are intermittent. “You don’t give a reward every single time,” Ellis explains. “This sort of keeps the cat guessing, they don’t know if running toward you this time will get the food or it’ll be the next time, and that actually makes the behavior more likely to happen.”

Who Says You Can’t Train A Cat? A Book Of Tips For Feline-Human Harmony

frontlinepbs:

frontlinepbs:

Michael Brown. Walter Scott. Akai Gurley. Eric Garner. Tamir Rice.

Over the past several years, the deaths of black men and boys like these at the hands of police officers have sparked a national debate about race, policing and civil rights, with the Department of Justice stepping in to mandate reform at several troubled police forces.

For more than a year, FRONTLINE has been reporting on the effectiveness of that process. Now, in a new documentary called Policing the Police that comes to PBS on June 28, FRONTLINE takes viewers on a provocative journey inside one police department that’s being forced to change its ways — specifically, the Newark Police Department (NPD) in New Jersey.

The Justice Department’s intervention in Newark wasn’t spurred by the shooting death of an unarmed black man, but by allegations of systemic civil rights violations over the years.

Watch on @pbstv or here starting June 28.

Keep an eye out for our new doc on Tuesday night, with the New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb. Join the conversation on Twitter with the hashtag #PoliceReform.

frontlinepbs:

frontlinepbs:

Michael Brown. Walter Scott. Akai Gurley. Eric Garner. Tamir Rice.

Over the past several years, the deaths of black men and boys like these at the hands of police officers have sparked a national debate about race, policing and civil rights, with the Department of Justice stepping in to mandate reform at several troubled police forces.

For more than a year, FRONTLINE has been reporting on the effectiveness of that process. Now, in a new documentary called Policing the Police that comes to PBS on June 28, FRONTLINE takes viewers on a provocative journey inside one police department that’s being forced to change its ways — specifically, the Newark Police Department (NPD) in New Jersey.

The Justice Department’s intervention in Newark wasn’t spurred by the shooting death of an unarmed black man, but by allegations of systemic civil rights violations over the years.

Watch on @pbstv or here starting June 28.

Keep an eye out for our new doc on Tuesday night, with the New Yorker’s Jelani Cobb. Join the conversation on Twitter with the hashtag #PoliceReform.

frontlinepbs:

Michael Brown. Walter Scott. Akai Gurley. Eric Garner. Tamir Rice.

Over the past several years, the deaths of black men and boys like these at the hands of police officers have sparked a national debate about race, policing and civil rights, with the Department of Justice stepping in to mandate reform at several troubled police forces.

For more than a year, FRONTLINE has been reporting on the effectiveness of that process. Now, in a new documentary called Policing the Police that comes to PBS on June 28, FRONTLINE takes viewers on a provocative journey inside one police department that’s being forced to change its ways — specifically, the Newark Police Department (NPD) in New Jersey.

The Justice Department’s intervention in Newark wasn’t spurred by the shooting death of an unarmed black man, but by allegations of systemic civil rights violations over the years.

Watch on @pbstv or here starting June 28.

skunkbear:

This spring I got in a car and followed the precise migration path of a young snowy owl named Baltimore. Thanks to cutting edge tracking technology, I was able to visit the exact perches Baltimore chose: a piece of driftwood on the Jersey coast … the top of a Manhattan skyscraper … the roof of the smallest radio station in Canada. Along the way, I got to meet the people touched by Baltimore’s migration, and I learned I learned a little about owl biology and behavior. We’re learning so much new info about this mysterious species. I hope you enjoy!

npr:

Deep in the ocean, a mission is underway to explore the “unknown and poorly known areas” around the Mariana Trench.

“Despite decades of previous work in the region,” the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says, “much of the [trench] and surrounding areas remain unexplored.”

Between April 20 and July 10, the government agency and its partners are collecting and sharing data on the creatures and habitats they find in the Mariana Trench, which stretches 1,500 miles in the Pacific Ocean near Guam.

You can follow NOAA’s live video streams from the Okeanos Explorer, including images from the ocean floor.

It’s all pretty mind-blowing when you think about it, but here’s one of our favorites: A mesmerizing jellyfish found around 3,700 meters (2.3 miles) down (video above!).

“At the beginning of the video, you’ll see that the long tentacles are even and extended outward and the bell is motionless,” NOAA notes. “This suggests an ambush predation mode. Within the bell, the radial canals in red are connecting points for what looks like the gonads in bright yellow.”

Secrets Of The Mariana Trench, Caught On Camera

ZOOVIE: A Warm And Fuzzy Tale from Marty on Vimeo.

The Imagination Agency presents its first Animated Short Film by MARTY. Starring Asher Roth. Cari Champion and Martellus Bennett. Music by Jennah Bell.

Cosmo is an optimistic kid on a mission to make blockbuster movies, and nothing can stand in his way. Well, except for the fact that he has no idea how to make a movie and has no budget to get started. Will his Zoomate pals Jett, Ellington and others be able to help Cosmo make box office smash hits? From action packed superhero films about the not so super Captain Waddlesworth, to a low budget sci-fi, there’s a ton of filming to do in McGuire’s Zoo. Cosmo and his friends are ready to make the world’s greatest movies and have a blast along the way.