usnatarchives:

Future statue, by Robert Aiken, 2015. (Photo by Jeff Reed, National Archives)

The National Archives’ larger-than-life statues

Do you want to learn more about the history and architecture of National Archives Building in Washington, DC? Join us online Thursday, May 24, 2018, at noon for a Facebook Live tour of the building’s exterior. For more information, follow us on Facebook!

On each side of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC (on Pennsylvania and Constitution Avenues), sit two 65-ton statues. Each statue is more than 10 feet high and, with their bases, tower 25 feet above the sidewalk.

They were carved from 1934 to 1935, and each came from a single piece of Indiana limestone. The sculptors and carvers worked on site in temporary structures created for them.

Because the stones were so large and heavy, they had to be brought by train to Washington from Indiana on specially designed flat cars.

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Rough block of stone from which one of the National Archives statues was carved, 1934. (Stone Magazine)

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Rough block of stone from which one of the National Archives statues was carved, 1934. (Stone Magazine)

Read more about the other giants over at Pieces of History. Which of the four “guardians” is your favorite?  

usnatarchives:

A National History Day participant poses with his National History Day “Red Tails” exhibit during the competition held at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on April 11-12, 2018. (National Archives photo, Jeffrey Reed)

Archives Hosts National History Day

By Kerri Lawrence  | National Archives News

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2018 — More than 270 middle and high school students from Washington, DC, enriched their understanding of history this week with a visit to the National Archives, which hosted an educational event for National History Day.  

National History Day is a year-long academic program focused on historical research, interpretation, and creative expression. By participating, students become writers, filmmakers, web designers, playwrights, and artists as they create unique contemporary expressions of history.

According to the nonprofit educational organization National History Day, more than 2,000 DC-based students from public, charter, independent, and home schools participate each year—with more than half a million middle and high school students participating nationwide.

Every year, National History Day frames students’ research within a historical theme. The theme for this year’s competition was “Conflict and Compromise in History.” Students can then select their own research topic within that framework.

The theme itself is chosen for its broad application to world, national, or state history and its relevance to ancient history or to the more recent past, according to DC National History Day coordinator Missy McNatt, an education specialist with the National Archives.

McNatt said that the theme offers a unique opportunity for students to think beyond the antiquated view of history as mere facts and dates. Students are able to delve deeper through an active exploration of real-world challenges and problems into the historical content, developing perspective and understanding.

Read more, about National History Day at National Archives News, plus more photos! 

usnatarchives:

A National History Day participant poses with his National History Day “Red Tails” exhibit during the competition held at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on April 11-12, 2018. (National Archives photo, Jeffrey Reed)

Archives Hosts National History Day

By Kerri Lawrence  | National Archives News

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2018 — More than 270 middle and high school students from Washington, DC, enriched their understanding of history this week with a visit to the National Archives, which hosted an educational event for National History Day.  

National History Day is a year-long academic program focused on historical research, interpretation, and creative expression. By participating, students become writers, filmmakers, web designers, playwrights, and artists as they create unique contemporary expressions of history.

According to the nonprofit educational organization National History Day, more than 2,000 DC-based students from public, charter, independent, and home schools participate each year—with more than half a million middle and high school students participating nationwide.

Every year, National History Day frames students’ research within a historical theme. The theme for this year’s competition was “Conflict and Compromise in History.” Students can then select their own research topic within that framework.

The theme itself is chosen for its broad application to world, national, or state history and its relevance to ancient history or to the more recent past, according to DC National History Day coordinator Missy McNatt, an education specialist with the National Archives.

McNatt said that the theme offers a unique opportunity for students to think beyond the antiquated view of history as mere facts and dates. Students are able to delve deeper through an active exploration of real-world challenges and problems into the historical content, developing perspective and understanding.

Read more, about National History Day at National Archives News, plus more photos! 

blackhistoryalbum:

PAT CLEVELAND |
VINTAGE

BLACK GLAMOUR & GRACE

Patricia Cleveland initially attained success in the 1960s and 1970s and was one of the first African-American models within the fashion industry to achieve prominence as both a runway and print modeL.

Despite her early success, Cleveland grew disillusioned with America and what she perceived to be its racist attitudes towards black models.She relocated to Paris in 1970,
vowing never to return to the United States until a black model appeared on the American cover of Vogue. Cleveland
returned to the U.S. in 1974 to continue her successful modeling career after Beverly Johnson became the first black model to appear on the cover of American Vogue in August 1974.

archiemcphee:

Merry Pawsmas! Sitting at the kids’ table is usually a lot more fun, but when the kids’ table is full of canine friends, it’s not just fun, it’s awesome! This year for Christmas dinner Versailles, KY-based couple Kelly and Zach Furr decided to make their holiday meal even more festive and entertaining by setting up a kids’ table for their dog and his friends.

Each pupper was dressed in a Christmas sweater and served with a big rawhide bone on their plate. Our favorite detail from this fantastic photo is the teeny-tiny chihuahua who’s so small he/she is sitting on a booster seat. We hope each of these adorable and impressively well behaved doggos found a World’s Best Dog Trophy in their Christmas stockings.

Visit BuzzFeed for more festive photos of the Furrs and their canine friends.

[via Neatorama]

archiemcphee:

Merry Pawsmas! Sitting at the kids’ table is usually a lot more fun, but when the kids’ table is full of canine friends, it’s not just fun, it’s awesome! This year for Christmas dinner Versailles, KY-based couple Kelly and Zach Furr decided to make their holiday meal even more festive and entertaining by setting up a kids’ table for their dog and his friends.

Each pupper was dressed in a Christmas sweater and served with a big rawhide bone on their plate. Our favorite detail from this fantastic photo is the teeny-tiny chihuahua who’s so small he/she is sitting on a booster seat. We hope each of these adorable and impressively well behaved doggos found a World’s Best Dog Trophy in their Christmas stockings.

Visit BuzzFeed for more festive photos of the Furrs and their canine friends.

[via Neatorama]

whitneymuseum:

New Year’s resolution to learn more about art? Sign up for our three-week course, which kicks off this January! Art As Activism, Activism as Art will consider different aesthetic strategies that artists have used to address the politically urgent questions of their time. Learn more/sign up at whitney.org

[Guerrilla Girls (b. 1985), Guerrilla Girls Review the Whitney, 1987. Offset lithograph, 22 × 17 in. (55.9 × 43.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 2000.91. © Guerrilla Girls]