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natgeoyourshot:

Top Shot: Meet the Kraken

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“During a dive, a huge octopus, annoyed by my presence, tried to take away my camera,” writes Your Shot photographer Guerino Salvatore. “I did not let myself be intimidated and I took a couple of shots. This is one of those shots.” Photograph by Guerino Salvatore

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natgeoyourshot:

Top Shot: 99% Human

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Carmer Huter made this portrait of a mountain gorilla in October 2017. “Despite it only lasting a split-second, this eye-to-eye moment with an alpha male gorilla in Uganda is a memory I shall cherish for the rest of my life,” Carmen writes. Mountain gorillas, a subspecies of the Eastern gorillas, are considered critically endangered due to war, human disease, habitat loss and poaching. Photograph by Carmen Huter

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natgeoyourshot:

Top Shot: Under Protection

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

Your Shot photographer Boris Barabáš captured this image of a young curious silvery langur embraced by his mum. “You may ask, why is he not “silvery”?“ writes Barabáš. "This is due to the fact that youngsters are born as bright orange. Only later, is their fur transformed into grey/silver.” Photograph by Boris Barabáš

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usnatarchives:

Future statue, by Robert Aiken, 2015. (Photo by Jeff Reed, National Archives)

The National Archives’ larger-than-life statues

Do you want to learn more about the history and architecture of National Archives Building in Washington, DC? Join us online Thursday, May 24, 2018, at noon for a Facebook Live tour of the building’s exterior. For more information, follow us on Facebook!

On each side of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC (on Pennsylvania and Constitution Avenues), sit two 65-ton statues. Each statue is more than 10 feet high and, with their bases, tower 25 feet above the sidewalk.

They were carved from 1934 to 1935, and each came from a single piece of Indiana limestone. The sculptors and carvers worked on site in temporary structures created for them.

Because the stones were so large and heavy, they had to be brought by train to Washington from Indiana on specially designed flat cars.

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Rough block of stone from which one of the National Archives statues was carved, 1934. (Stone Magazine)

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Rough block of stone from which one of the National Archives statues was carved, 1934. (Stone Magazine)

Read more about the other giants over at Pieces of History. Which of the four “guardians” is your favorite?  

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usnatarchives:

A National History Day participant poses with his National History Day “Red Tails” exhibit during the competition held at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on April 11-12, 2018. (National Archives photo, Jeffrey Reed)

Archives Hosts National History Day

By Kerri Lawrence  | National Archives News

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2018 — More than 270 middle and high school students from Washington, DC, enriched their understanding of history this week with a visit to the National Archives, which hosted an educational event for National History Day.  

National History Day is a year-long academic program focused on historical research, interpretation, and creative expression. By participating, students become writers, filmmakers, web designers, playwrights, and artists as they create unique contemporary expressions of history.

According to the nonprofit educational organization National History Day, more than 2,000 DC-based students from public, charter, independent, and home schools participate each year—with more than half a million middle and high school students participating nationwide.

Every year, National History Day frames students’ research within a historical theme. The theme for this year’s competition was “Conflict and Compromise in History.” Students can then select their own research topic within that framework.

The theme itself is chosen for its broad application to world, national, or state history and its relevance to ancient history or to the more recent past, according to DC National History Day coordinator Missy McNatt, an education specialist with the National Archives.

McNatt said that the theme offers a unique opportunity for students to think beyond the antiquated view of history as mere facts and dates. Students are able to delve deeper through an active exploration of real-world challenges and problems into the historical content, developing perspective and understanding.

Read more, about National History Day at National Archives News, plus more photos!