Interesting

natgeoyourshot:

Photos of the Week Series: August 10, 2018

Associate Photo Editor Kristen McNicholas has been responsible for looking at daily uploads so she has the first set of eyes on every image that the Your Shot community shares. She starts each day looking through thousands of photographs and this series will be a selection of her favorites from the past week. Each Friday she will be sharing her favorites here!

“Hello Your Shot community! This is Senior Producer Matt Adams tagging in for Kristen with today’s Photos of the Week. I have to say she’s a tough act to follow and editing the best of from this amazing community is no easy task. My selections for this week involved images that made me want to be in the moment with our photographers. Whether it’s watching fireworks in Vancouver, riding a train in Sri Lanka or watching brown bears in Alaska feast on salmon these images made me want to be in these locations capturing these moments alongside our talented Your Shot photographers.”

Join the Your Shot community to begin sharing your stories with us.

Photographs by Agnieszka Maruszczyk, Tim Koster, Wes Giang, David & Shiela Glatz, Mehmet Demırci, Loredana Bîtculescu, Piotrek Deska, Celia M., Steve Roe and Mehran Shariati.

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todaysdocument:

The Jefferson Memorial turns 75

On Friday, April 13, 2018, the memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson—our third President and principal author of the Declaration of Independence—turns 75.

The memorial’s architect, John Russell Pope (1874–1937), was also architect of the National Archives Building. While Pope lived long enough to see the opening of the Archives, he died before groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial had even commenced. His partners, Daniel P. Higgins and Otto R. Eggers, had to take over the memorial’s construction.

After Pope’s death, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission, which oversaw the project, made changes to Pope’s design to counter some criticism about the scale of the memorial and address an outcry over plans to remove numerous cherry trees around the Tidal Basin. Construction on the revised plans began on December 15, 1938. The following November, President Franklin D. Roosevelt attended the cornerstone-laying ceremony.

Earlier in 1938, the commission had held a competition to select sculptors for the memorial. From more than 100 entries, they chose Rudulph Evans as the main sculptor and Adolph A. Weinman to sculpt the pediment relief located above the entrance. Weinman also designed the pediment on the north side of the National Archives Building, facing Pennsylvania Avenue, titled Destiny.

President Roosevelt returned on April 13, 1943, to dedicate the memorial, which coincided with the 200th anniversary of Jefferson’s birth. Due to metal shortages during World War II, Evans had not yet been able to complete the 10,000-pound, 19-foot-tall bronze statue of Jefferson, and instead a plaster cast was painted to mimic bronze (the bronze statue was not installed until 1947).

During the dedication celebration, the original Declaration of Independence was on display in the new memorial. Guarded 24 hours a day by a Marine Honor Guard, the document had been brought out of its war hiding place, Fort Knox. At that time, the Library of Congress had custody over the Declaration and moved it out of the city as a war precaution.

Seventy-five years later,  the Declaration is housed at the National Archives. And the Jefferson Memorial still stands over the Tidal Basin as a favorite designation for viewing the cherry blossoms each spring.

Happy 275th Birthday to Thomas Jefferson and 75th to the Jefferson Memorial!

via The Jefferson Memorial turns 75 | Pieces of History

Interesting

todaysdocument:

The Jefferson Memorial turns 75

On Friday, April 13, 2018, the memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson—our third President and principal author of the Declaration of Independence—turns 75.

The memorial’s architect, John Russell Pope (1874–1937), was also architect of the National Archives Building. While Pope lived long enough to see the opening of the Archives, he died before groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial had even commenced. His partners, Daniel P. Higgins and Otto R. Eggers, had to take over the memorial’s construction.

After Pope’s death, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission, which oversaw the project, made changes to Pope’s design to counter some criticism about the scale of the memorial and address an outcry over plans to remove numerous cherry trees around the Tidal Basin. Construction on the revised plans began on December 15, 1938. The following November, President Franklin D. Roosevelt attended the cornerstone-laying ceremony.

Earlier in 1938, the commission had held a competition to select sculptors for the memorial. From more than 100 entries, they chose Rudulph Evans as the main sculptor and Adolph A. Weinman to sculpt the pediment relief located above the entrance. Weinman also designed the pediment on the north side of the National Archives Building, facing Pennsylvania Avenue, titled Destiny.

President Roosevelt returned on April 13, 1943, to dedicate the memorial, which coincided with the 200th anniversary of Jefferson’s birth. Due to metal shortages during World War II, Evans had not yet been able to complete the 10,000-pound, 19-foot-tall bronze statue of Jefferson, and instead a plaster cast was painted to mimic bronze (the bronze statue was not installed until 1947).

During the dedication celebration, the original Declaration of Independence was on display in the new memorial. Guarded 24 hours a day by a Marine Honor Guard, the document had been brought out of its war hiding place, Fort Knox. At that time, the Library of Congress had custody over the Declaration and moved it out of the city as a war precaution.

Seventy-five years later,  the Declaration is housed at the National Archives. And the Jefferson Memorial still stands over the Tidal Basin as a favorite designation for viewing the cherry blossoms each spring.

Happy 275th Birthday to Thomas Jefferson and 75th to the Jefferson Memorial!

via The Jefferson Memorial turns 75 | Pieces of History

Interesting

archiemcphee:

This afternoon the Department of Unexpected Interspecies Friendship is hanging out with Chowder the pot-bellied pig and her five rescued canine friends, Rika, Slick, Nya, James, Bashe. Together they form Piggypoo_and_crew and they live in Souther California with their doting human, Shelby Madere.

image

In an interview with the Instagram blog, Madere openly expressed her devotion to every one of the animals.

“My Wonderful Treasures Devotion and Commitment. …When I look at my crew, I see the reflection of who I am in them. Their happiness, their safety, their health, their whole lives rely on me and I will never ever let them down.”

Follow Chowder and her pupper pals on Instagram to keep up with their latest heartwarming adventures.

[via My Modern Met]