Interesting

todaysdocument:

The Jefferson Memorial turns 75

On Friday, April 13, 2018, the memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson—our third President and principal author of the Declaration of Independence—turns 75.

The memorial’s architect, John Russell Pope (1874–1937), was also architect of the National Archives Building. While Pope lived long enough to see the opening of the Archives, he died before groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial had even commenced. His partners, Daniel P. Higgins and Otto R. Eggers, had to take over the memorial’s construction.

After Pope’s death, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission, which oversaw the project, made changes to Pope’s design to counter some criticism about the scale of the memorial and address an outcry over plans to remove numerous cherry trees around the Tidal Basin. Construction on the revised plans began on December 15, 1938. The following November, President Franklin D. Roosevelt attended the cornerstone-laying ceremony.

Earlier in 1938, the commission had held a competition to select sculptors for the memorial. From more than 100 entries, they chose Rudulph Evans as the main sculptor and Adolph A. Weinman to sculpt the pediment relief located above the entrance. Weinman also designed the pediment on the north side of the National Archives Building, facing Pennsylvania Avenue, titled Destiny.

President Roosevelt returned on April 13, 1943, to dedicate the memorial, which coincided with the 200th anniversary of Jefferson’s birth. Due to metal shortages during World War II, Evans had not yet been able to complete the 10,000-pound, 19-foot-tall bronze statue of Jefferson, and instead a plaster cast was painted to mimic bronze (the bronze statue was not installed until 1947).

During the dedication celebration, the original Declaration of Independence was on display in the new memorial. Guarded 24 hours a day by a Marine Honor Guard, the document had been brought out of its war hiding place, Fort Knox. At that time, the Library of Congress had custody over the Declaration and moved it out of the city as a war precaution.

Seventy-five years later,  the Declaration is housed at the National Archives. And the Jefferson Memorial still stands over the Tidal Basin as a favorite designation for viewing the cherry blossoms each spring.

Happy 275th Birthday to Thomas Jefferson and 75th to the Jefferson Memorial!

via The Jefferson Memorial turns 75 | Pieces of History

Interesting

todaysdocument:

The Jefferson Memorial turns 75

On Friday, April 13, 2018, the memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson—our third President and principal author of the Declaration of Independence—turns 75.

The memorial’s architect, John Russell Pope (1874–1937), was also architect of the National Archives Building. While Pope lived long enough to see the opening of the Archives, he died before groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial had even commenced. His partners, Daniel P. Higgins and Otto R. Eggers, had to take over the memorial’s construction.

After Pope’s death, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission, which oversaw the project, made changes to Pope’s design to counter some criticism about the scale of the memorial and address an outcry over plans to remove numerous cherry trees around the Tidal Basin. Construction on the revised plans began on December 15, 1938. The following November, President Franklin D. Roosevelt attended the cornerstone-laying ceremony.

Earlier in 1938, the commission had held a competition to select sculptors for the memorial. From more than 100 entries, they chose Rudulph Evans as the main sculptor and Adolph A. Weinman to sculpt the pediment relief located above the entrance. Weinman also designed the pediment on the north side of the National Archives Building, facing Pennsylvania Avenue, titled Destiny.

President Roosevelt returned on April 13, 1943, to dedicate the memorial, which coincided with the 200th anniversary of Jefferson’s birth. Due to metal shortages during World War II, Evans had not yet been able to complete the 10,000-pound, 19-foot-tall bronze statue of Jefferson, and instead a plaster cast was painted to mimic bronze (the bronze statue was not installed until 1947).

During the dedication celebration, the original Declaration of Independence was on display in the new memorial. Guarded 24 hours a day by a Marine Honor Guard, the document had been brought out of its war hiding place, Fort Knox. At that time, the Library of Congress had custody over the Declaration and moved it out of the city as a war precaution.

Seventy-five years later,  the Declaration is housed at the National Archives. And the Jefferson Memorial still stands over the Tidal Basin as a favorite designation for viewing the cherry blossoms each spring.

Happy 275th Birthday to Thomas Jefferson and 75th to the Jefferson Memorial!

via The Jefferson Memorial turns 75 | Pieces of History

Interesting

pbsthisdayinhistoryAPRIL 4, 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr. Assassinated

Forty-four years ago, civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death in Memphis, Tennessee.

Watch this American Experience clip of King describing the teachings of the nonviolence movement.

King also shares his thoughts on Malcolm X’s criticism and President Kennedy’s strides to help the Civil Rights Movement.

History

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr. Assassinated

Forty-four years ago, civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot to death in Memphis, Tennessee.

Please click here to watch this American Experience clip of King describing the teachings of the nonviolence movement.

King also shares his thoughts on Malcolm X’s criticism and President Kennedy’s strides to help the Civil Rights Movement.

Source: PBS This Day In History

Scientific

My Los Gatos estate for your Facebook shares, Silicon Valley exec says

In a Silicon Valley real estate market crazed by the impending Facebook public offering, this may be worth a second look.

A valley executive says he’ll swap his 11.5-acre estate in Los Gatos for about $29 million worth of pre-IPO Facebook shares.

The owner, Ken Raasch, says the offer is genuine, although he won’t turn down cash.

“We’re serious,” said Raasch, who has lived with his wife, Linda, and four children in the palatial home for the past 15 years.

Tucked away in a parklike setting in the Los Gatos hills, the 10,000-square-foot house was built in 1989 and purchased by the Raasches in 1997.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Pete Carey at San Jose Mercury News.
Image Source: Alain Pinel Realtors

Funny

PHOTO: Hot dog cancer billboard puts it bluntly

There is a wiener war going on and part of the battle ended up on the Eisenhower expressway.

If you’re headed out of the city on the Ike, you’ll spot a billboard between Cicero and Kostner that reads, “Hot Dogs Cause Butt Cancer.”

It’s part of an ad campaign by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.  There are billboards like this across the country.  In Miami, a sign reads, “Hot dogs can take you out of the game.”  Chicago was the only one fortunate enough to get the “butt cancer” poster.  The group is trying to spread the message that red and processed meats have been linked to cancer.  The PCRM says it was shocked by a study showing almost 40 percent of Americans don’t know what the colon is.

Please click here to read the original article at FM News Chicago.

Interesting

Social Good Stars: Craigslist Founder Craig Newmark Discusses Intersection of Causes and Tech

The internet has opened many doors, and Craig Newmark was one of the first entrepreneurs to help open them and start making a difference, back in 1995. Craig is the founder of Craigslist, the web-based platform where people can help each other with everyday needs. It is now one of the 10 most-visited English language web platforms, serving every continent on earth (except Antarctica).

Craig has devoted much of his life to the philosophy that we all need to help one another, and has taken it to new levels via his philanthropy. He is devoted not only to making a difference, but to helping others make a difference, too.

In March 2011 Craig launched Craigconnects, his initiative to link up everyone on the planet using the Internet to bear witness to good efforts and encourage the same behavior in others. Craigconnects seeks to support technology and platforms that enhance connectivity, help more people and organizations do good in the world, and improve and ensure media integrity.

Craigconnects evolved from Craig’s many years of personal involvement with nonprofit organizations and issues he considers vital. He serves on the board of directors for 3 nonprofit organizations, advisory boards of 11 others, and provides personal or financial support to dozens more who use the internet to help solve social issues, provide for America’s returning veterans, drive funding for school projects directly to the classroom, or help government agencies and groups with innovation initiatives.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Amy Neumann at Huffington Post.

Interesting

Social Good Stars: Craiglist Founder Craig Newmark Discusses Intersection of Cause and Tech

The internet has opened many doors, and Craig Newmark was one of the first entrepreneurs to help open them and start making a difference, back in 1995. Craig is the founder of Craigslist, the web-based platform where people can help each other with everyday needs. It is now one of the 10 most-visited English language web platforms, serving every continent on earth (except Antarctica).

Craig has devoted much of his life to the philosophy that we all need to help one another, and has taken it to new levels via his philanthropy. He is devoted not only to making a difference, but to helping others make a difference, too.

In March 2011 Craig launched Craigconnects, his initiative to link up everyone on the planet using the Internet to bear witness to good efforts and encourage the same behavior in others. Craigconnects seeks to support technology and platforms that enhance connectivity, help more people and organizations do good in the world, and improve and ensure media integrity.

Craigconnects evolved from Craig’s many years of personal involvement with nonprofit organizations and issues he considers vital. He serves on the board of directors for 3 nonprofit organizations, advisory boards of 11 others, and provides personal or financial support to dozens more who use the internet to help solve social issues, provide for America’s returning veterans, drive funding for school projects directly to the classroom, or help government agencies and groups with innovation initiatives.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Amy Neumann at Huffington Post.

Photography

Leaping On Leap Day With Vintage Photos

What is there to say, really? Thanks to some bad Gregorian math or something, we get a whole extra day every four years. Leap day is special, so let’s celebrate with some relevant photos — all found in Flickr Commons. Share your leap scenes with us on Flickr!

MORE on leap day:

What if you were born today? (Like Ron Paul’s wife.) You have fewer birthdays than most — which is great. In your 64th year of life, you can celebrate your 16th birthday.

If you’re in France, you get the privilege of reading a quadrennial newspaper.

Also in Europe, women can propose marriage with a steak on Leap Day. What more could you want?

Don’t know what to do with the excess time? Here’s some help.

Please click here to view the original article by Claire O’Neill at NPR.

Photo credit: Flickr Commons

Interesting

PBS This Day In History: George Washington was born

280 years ago today, George Washington, commander-in-chief in the Revolutionary War and the first president of the United States, was born.

Explore a timeline of George Washington’s life, broken out into four parts: his personal life, his early military career, the Revolutionary War, and the presidency.

Source: pbs.org