Interesting

natgeoyourshot:

Top Shot: Meet the Kraken

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“During a dive, a huge octopus, annoyed by my presence, tried to take away my camera,” writes Your Shot photographer Guerino Salvatore. “I did not let myself be intimidated and I took a couple of shots. This is one of those shots.” Photograph by Guerino Salvatore

Interesting

smithsonianlibraries:

Peek-a-boo!

Here are some fluffies in The marine mammals of the north-western coast of North America, described and illustrated; together with an account of the American whale-fishery. by Charles Melville

Scammon, (1874), which we scanned for the Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Learn more about Charles Melville Scammon and this book over at the Harvard Library Preservation’s blog, The Shelf.

Interesting

Better Than A Van Gogh: NASA Visualizes All The World’s Ocean Currents 

We imagine the ocean as having high tides and low tides, water that comes in and out in waves. Beyond that, how does water actually move around the world? What’s that flow look like?

NASA Scientific Visualization Studio assembled this remarkable animation of the surface currents of our oceans. It’s called Perpetual Ocean, and the full work is 20 minutes of HD video, assembled from a huge amount of satellite, on location, and computational data generated by ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase 2). ECCO2 itself exists to better understand our oceans and their role in the changing global climate.

What you’re looking at is the surface current flow (not anything deeper) of oceans around the world, recorded from 2006 to 2007. The white lines are the currents, and the darker blue colors of the water represent bathymetry (the fancy word for misnomer “ocean topography”).

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Mark Wilson at Fast Company’s Co.Design.

Art, Interesting, Photography, Scientific

Better Than A Van Gogh: NASA Visualizes All The World’s Ocean Currents

We imagine the ocean as having high tides and low tides, water that comes in and out in waves. Beyond that, how does water actually move around the world? What’s that flow look like?

NASA Scientific Visualization Studio assembled this remarkable animation of the surface currents of our oceans. It’s called Perpetual Ocean, and the full work is 20 minutes of HD video, assembled from a huge amount of satellite, on location, and computational data generated by ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase 2). ECCO2 itself exists to better understand our oceans and their role in the changing global climate.

What you’re looking at is the surface current flow (not anything deeper) of oceans around the world, recorded from 2006 to 2007. The white lines are the currents, and the darker blue colors of the water represent bathymetry (the fancy word for misnomer “ocean topography”).

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Mark Wilson at Fast Company’s Co.Design.