amnhnyc:

This mini-monkey could fit in a human’s hand: the pygmy marmoset (Callithrix pygmaea) may look like a tiny squirrel as it dashes through the rainforest canopy of South America, but this primate is actually the world’s smallest monkey. Weighing in at 140 g and growing to be 13 cm long, it has a tail that’s longer than its body—and while not prehensile, it helps this monkey balance in the trees.
Photo: Laura Wolf

A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics

A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics

The objective of this study has been to confirm the sex and the affinity of an individual buried in a well‐furnished warrior grave (Bj 581) in the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden. Previously, based on…

Source: A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics

View On WordPress

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

typhlonectes:

Octopus Eyes Are Crazier Than We Imagined

by Maddie Stone

The latest fascinating cephalopod insights come to us from a
father/son team of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley
and Harvard University, who’ve learned that weirdly-shaped pupils may
allow cephalopods to distinguish colors differently from any other
animals we know of. The discovery is published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.

Boring animals like humans and birds see color using a combination of
light-receptive cone cells, each of which contains pigments that are
sensitive to a different part of the visual spectrum. It’s only by
combining information from different cone cells that colors can be
properly distinguished. Hence, when a person lacks a particular type of
cone, he’s considered colorblind.

Cephalopods only have a single type of light receptor, which means
they should not be able to distinguish color at all. And yet, many
octopuses, squids and cuttlefish have color-changing skin that’s used
for elaborate camouflage ruses and courtship rituals. Clearly, these
colorblind animals have become masters of color manipulation. How? …

(read more: Gizmodo)

photographs: NOAA,
Roy Caldwell, and Klaus Stiefel

todaysdocument:

Gemini XI Mission Image -Australia, 9/14/1966

File Unit: Gemini XI, 9/13/1966 – 9/15/1966Series: Photographs of the Mercury and Gemini Space Programs, 12/1960 – 2/1997Record Group 255: Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 – 2006

Taken 50 years ago, more stunning images like this one from @nasa‘s Gemini XI Mission can be found in the File Unit Gemini XI, 09/13/1966 – 09/15/1966 in the National Archives online Catalog.

skunkbear:

A deadly fungus, chytrid, is attacking frogs’ skin and wiping out hundreds of species worldwide. A chytrid infection prevents the normal movement of water and nutrients through the amphibians’s skin. 

In the San Francisco Bay Area, Mountain yellow-legged frogs, found only in California’s alpine lakes, have been in steep decline due to the fungus (as well as predation by non-native trout). More than 90 percent of the population has disappeared.  

Now in a last-ditch effort, scientists are trying something new: build defenses against the fungus through a kind of fungus “vaccine.”

Read more about the effort to battle chytrid fungus here. And watch the video by PBS Digital Studios’ Deep Look here.

Video Credit: Josh Cassidy/KQED

Study proposes explanation for how cephalopods see color, despite black and white vision

eartharchives:

Cephalopods probably detect color by adjusting their eyes to detect different wavelengths of light, and then composite each into a “color” image of their world.

Study proposes explanation for how cephalopods see color, despite black and white vision

skunkbear:

Some of the heaviest elements ever seen have been given tentative names by their discoverers. The namesakes? Three places and a Russian dude.

These names aren’t settled on quite yet – there is a five month probation period during which the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) welcomes public comment. You can email the IUPAC president directly with your thoughts.

If you discovered an element, what would you name it?

skunkbear:

The luminous haze that obscures our view of the constellations – light pollution -is one of the most prevalent forms of environmental alteration. Its impact is felt across a swath of life from the migration of sea turtles to the circadian rhythm of humans. 

A new atlas of light pollution created by an international team of scientists reveals just how pervasive this artificial glow is. The atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans.

Check out this interactive map and read more here.