Interesting

momalibrary:

“This home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright represents the finest of contemporary architecture. Just as the Futuramic Oldsmobile represents the farthest advancement in automotive design.”

The MoMA Library’s current show, Frank Lloyd Wright: Publishing the Self, examines the architect’s career-long engagement with print media. As this example shows, Wright made little distinction between editorial content and advertising.

The show complements the major retrospective exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive. -jt

Movie

Marlon Brando born on April 3, 1924

Marlon Brando, Jr. (April 3, 1924 – July 1, 2004) was an American movie star and political activist. “Unchallenged as the most important actor in modern American Cinema” according to the St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, Brando was one of only three professional actors, along with Charlie Chaplin and Marilyn Monroe, named by Time magazine as one of its 100 Persons of the Century in 1999.

Brando had a significant impact on film acting, and was the foremost example of the “method” acting style. While he became notorious for his “mumbling” diction and exuding a raw animal magnetism, his mercurial performances were nonetheless highly regarded, and he is widely considered as one of the greatest and most influential actors of the 20th century. Director Martin Scorsese said of him, “He is the marker. There’s ‘before Brando’ and ‘after Brando’.” Actor Jack Nicholson once said, “When Marlon dies, everybody moves up one.” He was ranked by the American Film Institute as the fourth greatest screen legend among male movie stars.

An enduring cultural icon, Brando became a box office star during the 1950s, during which time he racked up five Oscar nominations as Best Actor, along with three consecutive wins of the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role. He initially gained popularity for recreating the role as Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), a Tennessee Williams play that had established him as a Broadway star during its 1947-49 stage run; and for his Academy Award-winning performance as Terry Malloy in On the Waterfront (1954), as well as for his iconic portrayal of the rebel motorcycle gang leader Johnny Strabler in The Wild One (1953), which is considered to be one of the most famous images in pop culture. Brando was also nominated for the Oscar for playing Emiliano Zapata in Viva Zapata! (1952); Mark Antony inJoseph L. Mankiewicz’s 1953 film adaptation of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar; and as Air Force Major Lloyd Gruver in Sayonara (1957), Joshua Logan’s adaption of James Michener’s 1954 novel.

He won his second Academy Award for playing Vito Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather (1972), a role critics consider among his greatest.

He finished out the decade of the 1970s with his highly controversial performance as Colonel Walter Kurtz in another Coppola film, Apocalypse Now (1979).

Source: Wikipedia

Photography

“Wonder Woman” stuntwoman Kitty O’Neil leaping off Valley Hilton in Sherman Oaks, California, 1979

It wasn’t a plane. It wasn’t a bird. It wasn’t even Wonder Woman. It was a stunt. On Monday, stuntwoman Kitty O’Neil plunged 127 feet from atop the Valley Hilton in Sherman Oaks into an inflated air bag at the pool deck–as the scene was being filmed for an upcoming two-hour special episode of the Wonder Woman series. A Warner Brothers spokeswoman said Miss O’Neil, who is deaf, established a new high fall record and broke her own previous mark of 120 feet. Before the leap, Miss O’Neil practiced by making two 10-story jumps. After the leap, she rode to the airport for a return flight to Bonneville, Utah, where she’s attempting to set a new world land speed record in her jet powered car.

Publication: Los Angeles Times, February 13, 1979

Source: Los Angeles Times photographic archive, UCLA Library.

Interesting

coolchicksfromhistory:

Los Angeles Times

February 13, 1979

It wasn’t a plane. It wasn’t a bird. It wasn’t even Wonder Woman. It was a stunt. On Monday, stuntwoman Kitty O’Neil plunged 127 feet from atop the Valley Hilton in Sherman Oaks into an inflated air bag at the pool deck—as the scene was being filmed for an upcoming two-hour special episode of the Wonder Woman series. A Warner Brothers spokeswoman said Miss O’Neil, who is deaf, established a new high fall record and broke her own previous mark of 120 feet. Before the leap, Miss O’Neil practiced by making two 10-story jumps. After the leap, she rode to the airport for a return flight to Bonneville, Utah, where she’s attempting to set a new world land speed record in her jet powered car.

Kitty O’Neil (born 1948) was a deaf stuntwoman and racer.  She set speed records in both driving and water skiing in addition to performing stunts for films such as The Blues Brothers.  Stockard Channing portrayed Kitty O’Neil in a 1979 TV movie.  In 1986, Kitty retired to South Dakota.  

History

Women’s lib 1902: How artist imagined career girls of the future (and yes, he was a man)

Despite being a tongue-in-cheek depiction of girls in uniform, Albert’s Bergeret’s collection of playing cards entitled ‘Women of the Future’ turned out to be an eerily accurate portrait of the modern world.

The French illustrator, renowned for his post cards, created a series of drawings in 1902 showing girls dressed as soldiers, lawyers, journalists and even army generals.

And while he was right in predicting women would one day join the work force, the impractical wardrobe choices were far from realistic.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Maysa Rawi at Daily Mail.

Interesting

Women’s lib 1902: How artist imagined career girls of the future (and yes, he was a man)

Despite being a tongue-in-cheek depiction of girls in uniform, Albert’s Bergeret’s collection of playing cards entitled ‘Women of the Future’ turned out to be an eerily accurate portrait of the modern world.

The French illustrator, renowned for his post cards, created a series of drawings in 1902 showing girls dressed as soldiers, lawyers, journalists and even army generals.

And while he was right in predicting women would one day join the work force, the impractical wardrobe choices were far from realistic.



Art

R.I.P. Golden Age Batman Artist Sheldon Moldoff

Last week, the comics community lost another of its foundational talents when Sheldon Moldoff passed away at 91 from kidney failure. Writer and historian Mark Evanier broke the news and offered an appraisal of the career of one of DC Comics early titans.

Born on April 19 of 1920, the artist known affectionately as Shelly found his early interest in comics and cartoons turn to professional work at a young age. Like many other up-and-coming New York City comics talents of the era, Moldoff began freelancing for DC during the Depression when at 17 he began selling one-off strips and other short works to the publisher. As Evanier notes, the artist was the last surviving creator who contributed to the landmark “Action Comics” #1 – the first appearance of Superman – with a one-page sports strip that graced the inside back cover.

Soon, Moldoff became one of the go-to cover artists for DC’s earliest days as well as an inker and production artist that saw him riding the line between freelancer and staffer in a way that drew more work with less credit than many of his contemporaries may have had. He drew the covers to both “Flash Comics” #1 and “All-American Comics” #16, which featured the debuts of the Flash and Green Lantern respectively. Soon after, All American Comics publisher Max Gaines tapped Moldoff to take over the Hawkman strip where the artist introduced Hawkgirl to the mix – one of the first of many characters whose look he would originate or whom he’d create whole cloth.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Kiel Phegley at Comic Book Resources.

Interesting

R.I.P. Golden Age Batman Artist Sheldon Moldoff

Last week, the comics community lost another of its foundational talents when Sheldon Moldoff passed away at 91 from kidney failure. Writer and historian Mark Evanier broke the news and offered an appraisal of the career of one of DC Comics early titans.

Born on April 19 of 1920, the artist known affectionately as Shelly found his early interest in comics and cartoons turn to professional work at a young age. Like many other up-and-coming New York City comics talents of the era, Moldoff began freelancing for DC during the Depression when at 17 he began selling one-off strips and other short works to the publisher. As Evanier notes, the artist was the last surviving creator who contributed to the landmark “Action Comics” #1 – the first appearance of Superman – with a one-page sports strip that graced the inside back cover.

Soon, Moldoff became one of the go-to cover artists for DC’s earliest days as well as an inker and production artist that saw him riding the line between freelancer and staffer in a way that drew more work with less credit than many of his contemporaries may have had. He drew the covers to both “Flash Comics” #1 and “All-American Comics” #16, which featured the debuts of the Flash and Green Lantern respectively. Soon after, All American Comics publisher Max Gaines tapped Moldoff to take over the Hawkman strip where the artist introduced Hawkgirl to the mix – one of the first of many characters whose look he would originate or whom he’d create whole cloth.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Kiel Phegley at Comic Book Resources.

Interesting

R.I.P. Golden Age Batman Artist Sheldon Moldoff

Last week, the comics community lost another of its foundational talents when Sheldon Moldoff passed away at 91 from kidney failure. Writer and historian Mark Evanier broke the news and offered an appraisal of the career of one of DC Comics early titans.

Born on April 19 of 1920, the artist known affectionately as Shelly found his early interest in comics and cartoons turn to professional work at a young age. Like many other up-and-coming New York City comics talents of the era, Moldoff began freelancing for DC during the Depression when at 17 he began selling one-off strips and other short works to the publisher. As Evanier notes, the artist was the last surviving creator who contributed to the landmark “Action Comics” #1 – the first appearance of Superman – with a one-page sports strip that graced the inside back cover.

Soon, Moldoff became one of the go-to cover artists for DC’s earliest days as well as an inker and production artist that saw him riding the line between freelancer and staffer in a way that drew more work with less credit than many of his contemporaries may have had. He drew the covers to both “Flash Comics” #1 and “All-American Comics” #16, which featured the debuts of the Flash and Green Lantern respectively. Soon after, All American Comics publisher Max Gaines tapped Moldoff to take over the Hawkman strip where the artist introduced Hawkgirl to the mix – one of the first of many characters whose look he would originate or whom he’d create whole cloth.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Kiel Phegley at Comic Book Resources.

Scientific

The iPad of 1935

There’s no denying that devices like the iPad, Kindle and Nook have dramatically changed the way that many people consume media. Last year, online retailer Amazon announced that electronic book sales had surpassed print book sales for the first time in history.

The future of the book has quite a few failed predictions in its wake. From Thomas Edison’s belief that books of the future would be printed on leaves of nickel, to a 1959 prediction that the text of a book would be projected on the ceiling of your home, no one knew for sure what was in store for the printed word.

The April, 1935 issue of Everyday Science and Mechanics included this nifty invention which was to be the next logical step in the world of publishing. Basically a microfilm reader mounted on a large pole, the media device was supposed to let you sit back in your favorite chair while reading your latest tome of choice.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Matt Novak at Smithsonian. 

Interesting

The iPad of 1935

There’s no denying that devices like the iPadKindle and Nook have dramatically changed the way that many people consume media. Last year, online retailer Amazon announced that electronic book sales had surpassed print book sales for the first time in history.

The future of the book has quite a few failed predictions in its wake. From Thomas Edison’s belief that books of the future would be printed on leaves of nickel, to a 1959 prediction that the text of a book would be projected on the ceiling of your home, no one knew for sure what was in store for the printed word.

The April, 1935 issue of Everyday Science and Mechanics included this nifty invention which was to be the next logical step in the world of publishing. Basically a microfilm reader mounted on a large pole, the media device was supposed to let you sit back in your favorite chair while reading your latest tome of choice.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Matt Novak at Smithsonian. 

Photography

New York, New York: Nostalgic wartime images romanticize the Big Apple in black and white

Farewell: A couple in Penn Station share a kiss before he ships off to WWII in December, 1943Landmark: Russian head Nikita S Khrushchev and his wife, center, meet the press at the top of the Empire State building in September, 1959Ruckus: Young boys with sticks, running around while playing a street game in Spanish Harlem in January, 1947Chic: A woman walks her poodles along Fifth Avenue in October, 1942Hazy: New York Harbor looking straight down bustling 42nd Street, January, 1946

From buskers in Times Square and 40ft tall billboards lighting up the theatre district, to the boardwalk in Coney Island, New York is known for its many landmarks.

But these nostalgic photographs are a distinctly different vision from the Big Apple we know today.

Antique cars and vintage wardrobe tell the story of old New York in these black and white photos taken by LIFE’s photographers between 1942 and 1970.

Please click here to continue reading the original article from Daily Mail UK.

Interesting

New York, New York: Nostalgic wartime images romanticize the Big Apple in black and white

From buskers in Times Square and 40ft tall billboards lighting up the theatre district, to the boardwalk in Coney Island, New York is known for its many landmarks.

But these nostalgic photographs are a distinctly different vision from the Big Apple we know today.

Antique cars and vintage wardrobe tell the story of old New York in these black and white photos taken by LIFE’s photographers between 1942 and 1970.

Please click here to continue reading the original article from Daily Mail UK.

Art

The Vintage Ads Of Dr. Seuss

Before Dr. Seuss gained worldwide fame as a beloved author and illustrator of children’s books, he paid the bills with advertising gigs and magazine artwork.  In fact, Theodore Seuss Geisel landed his first paying job after leaving Oxford with the New York City publication Judge.

In the 1920s, Seuss embarked on a career as an advertising illustrator, a job that garnered him national exposure and a better paycheck.  A series of cartoons for Flit bug spray kicked open the door for Seuss.  One illustration shows three guys in a tank as an oversized mosquito jettisons toward them.  In large yellow words it reads: “Quick Henry, The Flit!”

Please click here to continue reading the original article at VINTAGE CATALOG ADVERTISEMENTS

Photography

Leaping On Leap Day With Vintage Photos

What is there to say, really? Thanks to some bad Gregorian math or something, we get a whole extra day every four years. Leap day is special, so let’s celebrate with some relevant photos — all found in Flickr Commons. Share your leap scenes with us on Flickr!

MORE on leap day:

What if you were born today? (Like Ron Paul’s wife.) You have fewer birthdays than most — which is great. In your 64th year of life, you can celebrate your 16th birthday.

If you’re in France, you get the privilege of reading a quadrennial newspaper.

Also in Europe, women can propose marriage with a steak on Leap Day. What more could you want?

Don’t know what to do with the excess time? Here’s some help.

Please click here to view the original article by Claire O’Neill at NPR.

Photo credit: Flickr Commons