Interesting

natgeoyourshot:

Top Shot: Meet the Kraken

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos selected by the Your Shot editors. The photo our community has voted as their favorite is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. Click here to vote for tomorrow’s Top Shot.

“During a dive, a huge octopus, annoyed by my presence, tried to take away my camera,” writes Your Shot photographer Guerino Salvatore. “I did not let myself be intimidated and I took a couple of shots. This is one of those shots.” Photograph by Guerino Salvatore

Interesting

the-future-now:

Scientists just identified the mysterious creature from 2009 footage as a ghost shark

  • Experts at the Monterey Bay
    Aquarium Research Institute have identified the mysterious creature they caught on camera in 2009 as a ghost shark,
    otherwise known as a chimaera.
  • Pacific Shark Research Center program
    director Dave Ebert called the discovery “dumb luck.“ 
  • The institute’s geologists spotted the animal off the Pacific coast of
    the U.S. via a remotely operated vehicle they plunged as far as 6,700
    feet beneath the ocean’s surface.
  • But at first, the researchers weren’t
    entirely sure of what they were seeing. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Interesting

the-future-now:

Scientists just identified the mysterious creature from 2009 footage as a ghost shark

  • Experts at the Monterey Bay
    Aquarium Research Institute have identified the mysterious creature they caught on camera in 2009 as a ghost shark,
    otherwise known as a chimaera.
  • Pacific Shark Research Center program
    director Dave Ebert called the discovery “dumb luck.“ 
  • The institute’s geologists spotted the animal off the Pacific coast of
    the U.S. via a remotely operated vehicle they plunged as far as 6,700
    feet beneath the ocean’s surface.
  • But at first, the researchers weren’t
    entirely sure of what they were seeing. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Interesting

typhlonectes:

Octopus Eyes Are Crazier Than We Imagined

by Maddie Stone

The latest fascinating cephalopod insights come to us from a
father/son team of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley
and Harvard University, who’ve learned that weirdly-shaped pupils may
allow cephalopods to distinguish colors differently from any other
animals we know of. The discovery is published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.

Boring animals like humans and birds see color using a combination of
light-receptive cone cells, each of which contains pigments that are
sensitive to a different part of the visual spectrum. It’s only by
combining information from different cone cells that colors can be
properly distinguished. Hence, when a person lacks a particular type of
cone, he’s considered colorblind.

Cephalopods only have a single type of light receptor, which means
they should not be able to distinguish color at all. And yet, many
octopuses, squids and cuttlefish have color-changing skin that’s used
for elaborate camouflage ruses and courtship rituals. Clearly, these
colorblind animals have become masters of color manipulation. How? …

(read more: Gizmodo)

photographs: NOAA,
Roy Caldwell, and Klaus Stiefel

Interesting

npr:

Deep in the ocean, a mission is underway to explore the “unknown and poorly known areas” around the Mariana Trench.

“Despite decades of previous work in the region,” the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says, “much of the [trench] and surrounding areas remain unexplored.”

Between April 20 and July 10, the government agency and its partners are collecting and sharing data on the creatures and habitats they find in the Mariana Trench, which stretches 1,500 miles in the Pacific Ocean near Guam.

You can follow NOAA’s live video streams from the Okeanos Explorer, including images from the ocean floor.

It’s all pretty mind-blowing when you think about it, but here’s one of our favorites: A mesmerizing jellyfish found around 3,700 meters (2.3 miles) down (video above!).

“At the beginning of the video, you’ll see that the long tentacles are even and extended outward and the bell is motionless,” NOAA notes. “This suggests an ambush predation mode. Within the bell, the radial canals in red are connecting points for what looks like the gonads in bright yellow.”

Secrets Of The Mariana Trench, Caught On Camera

Interesting

kqedscience:

Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage

Tiny and delicate, pygmy seahorses survive by attaching to vibrant corals where they become nearly invisible to both predators and researchers. Now, biologists at the calacademy have successfully bred them in captivity for the first time. Finally, they’re able to study the seahorses’ amazing act of camouflage up close. 

Subscribe to Deep Look on YouTube to see new videos from our pbsdigitalstudios series every two weeks.

Learn more about pygmy seahorses at KQED Science.