Interesting

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Interesting

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Interesting

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Interesting, Photography

NPR Global Health: Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature

nprglobalhealth:

Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature

Airports in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are relying on a familiar tool to stop the spread of Ebola: the thermometer.

Airport staff are measuring the temperature of anyone trying to leave the country, looking for “unexplained febrile illness,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is advising these countries on their exit screening processes.

Other countries that are far from the infected region are screening passengers arriving from West Africa or who have a history of travel to the region. Temperature takers include Russia, Australia and India.

Travelers who exhibit an elevated fever, generally over 101.4 degrees Fahrenheit (though it varies by country), are stopped for further screening. That could mean a questionnaire or medical tests.

Critics of exit screening have pointed out the flaws in using thermometers: fever can lay dormant for two to 21 days in someone who’s been infected with Ebola, and low-grade fevers can be lowered further by simple medications like Tylenol or Advil.

While they can’t predict symptoms before they emerge, the CDC is prepared to thwart those trying to mask a fever with a pill.

“Airline and airport staff are trained to do visual checks of anyone who looks even slightly ill,” says Tai Chen, a quarantine medical officer from the CDC who returned from Liberia this past Tuesday. “And most airports are using multiple temperature checks, starting when you arrive on the airport grounds in your car until you get on the plane. Even if you take medication, your fever will likely have manifested by then.”

Here’s the three methods that can be used at airports.

Photo: A Nepalese health worker uses a handheld infrared thermometer on a passenger arriving at Nepal’s only international airport in Kathmandu. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

Interesting

Measures to improve public health, relating as they do to such obvious and mundane matters as housing, smoking, and food, may lack the glamour of high-technology medicine, but what they lack in excitement they gain in their potential impact on health, precisely because they deal with the major causes of common disease and disabilities.

Geoffrey Rose, 1992 (via publichealthfiles)
Funny

PHOTO: Hot dog cancer billboard puts it bluntly

There is a wiener war going on and part of the battle ended up on the Eisenhower expressway.

If you’re headed out of the city on the Ike, you’ll spot a billboard between Cicero and Kostner that reads, “Hot Dogs Cause Butt Cancer.”

It’s part of an ad campaign by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.  There are billboards like this across the country.  In Miami, a sign reads, “Hot dogs can take you out of the game.”  Chicago was the only one fortunate enough to get the “butt cancer” poster.  The group is trying to spread the message that red and processed meats have been linked to cancer.  The PCRM says it was shocked by a study showing almost 40 percent of Americans don’t know what the colon is.

Please click here to read the original article at FM News Chicago.

Interesting

Photo: Hot dog cancer billboard puts it bluntly

There is a wiener war going on and part of the battle ended up on the Eisenhower expressway.

If you’re headed out of the city on the Ike, you’ll spot a billboard between Cicero and Kostner that reads, “Hot Dogs Cause Butt Cancer.”

It’s part of an ad campaign by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.  There are billboards like this across the country.  In Miami, a sign reads, “Hot dogs can take you out of the game.”  Chicago was the only one fortunate enough to get the “butt cancer” poster.  The group is trying to spread the message that red and processed meats have been linked to cancer.  The PCRM says it was shocked by a study showing almost 40 percent of Americans don’t know what the colon is.

Please click here to read the original article at FM News Chicago.