NPR Global Health: Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature

nprglobalhealth:

Some Airports Have A New Security Routine: Taking Your Temperature

Airports in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are relying on a familiar tool to stop the spread of Ebola: the thermometer.

Airport staff are measuring the temperature of anyone trying to leave the country, looking for “unexplained febrile illness,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is advising these countries on their exit screening processes.

Other countries that are far from the infected region are screening passengers arriving from West Africa or who have a history of travel to the region. Temperature takers include Russia, Australia and India.

Travelers who exhibit an elevated fever, generally over 101.4 degrees Fahrenheit (though it varies by country), are stopped for further screening. That could mean a questionnaire or medical tests.

Critics of exit screening have pointed out the flaws in using thermometers: fever can lay dormant for two to 21 days in someone who’s been infected with Ebola, and low-grade fevers can be lowered further by simple medications like Tylenol or Advil.

While they can’t predict symptoms before they emerge, the CDC is prepared to thwart those trying to mask a fever with a pill.

“Airline and airport staff are trained to do visual checks of anyone who looks even slightly ill,” says Tai Chen, a quarantine medical officer from the CDC who returned from Liberia this past Tuesday. “And most airports are using multiple temperature checks, starting when you arrive on the airport grounds in your car until you get on the plane. Even if you take medication, your fever will likely have manifested by then.”

Here’s the three methods that can be used at airports.

Photo: A Nepalese health worker uses a handheld infrared thermometer on a passenger arriving at Nepal’s only international airport in Kathmandu. (Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images)

EEOC Says Wellness Program Violates ADA

Joe's HR and Benefits Blog

An employer can have a program that rewards employees for attaining positive health goals, but it must remain voluntary and not penalize workers who decline to participate, the EEOC said yesterday in announcing its first Americans With Disabilities Act lawsuit over such programs.

According to the EEOC, Orion Energy Systems, based in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, violated the ADA by requiring an employee to submit to medical examinations and questions that were not job-related or consistent with business necessity as part of its wellness program. And when the employee refused to participate in the program, the company allegedly transferred responsibility for paying the entire health premium to her.

A majority of employers now offer some sort of wellness program — 94 percent of employers with over 200 workers, and 63 percent of smaller ones, according to Karen Pollitz of the Kaiser Family Foundation. So employers with these programs need to be especially mindful…

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PHOTO: Hot dog cancer billboard puts it bluntly

There is a wiener war going on and part of the battle ended up on the Eisenhower expressway.

If you’re headed out of the city on the Ike, you’ll spot a billboard between Cicero and Kostner that reads, “Hot Dogs Cause Butt Cancer.”

It’s part of an ad campaign by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.  There are billboards like this across the country.  In Miami, a sign reads, “Hot dogs can take you out of the game.”  Chicago was the only one fortunate enough to get the “butt cancer” poster.  The group is trying to spread the message that red and processed meats have been linked to cancer.  The PCRM says it was shocked by a study showing almost 40 percent of Americans don’t know what the colon is.

Please click here to read the original article at FM News Chicago.

Photo: Hot dog cancer billboard puts it bluntly

There is a wiener war going on and part of the battle ended up on the Eisenhower expressway.

If you’re headed out of the city on the Ike, you’ll spot a billboard between Cicero and Kostner that reads, “Hot Dogs Cause Butt Cancer.”

It’s part of an ad campaign by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.  There are billboards like this across the country.  In Miami, a sign reads, “Hot dogs can take you out of the game.”  Chicago was the only one fortunate enough to get the “butt cancer” poster.  The group is trying to spread the message that red and processed meats have been linked to cancer.  The PCRM says it was shocked by a study showing almost 40 percent of Americans don’t know what the colon is.

Please click here to read the original article at FM News Chicago.

A Quest to Understand How Memory Works

At 82, the Nobel Prize-winning neuroscientist Dr. Eric R. Kandel is still constantly coming up with new ideas for research.

This winter, he has been working on a project that he hopes will lead to a new class of drugs for treating schizophrenia. Last year he collaborated, for the first time, with Denise B. Kandel — his fellow Columbia University research scientist and wife of 55 years — investigating the biological links between cigarette and cocaine addiction. And this month his newest book, “The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain, From Vienna 1900 to the Present,” is to be released by Random House.

A condensed and edited version of our two interviews follows. As in his new book, the conversation begins with memories of Vienna, his birthplace.

How old were you when the Nazis marched into Vienna?

I was 8 ½. Immediately, we saw that our lives were in danger. We were completely abandoned by our non-Jewish friends and neighbors. No one spoke to me in school. One boy walked up to me and said, “My father said I’m not to speak to you anymore.” When we went to the park, we were roughed up. Then, on Nov. 9, 1938, Kristallnacht, we were booted out of our apartment, which was looted. We knew we had to get out.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Claudia Dreifus at The New York Times.