Interesting

usnatarchives:

A National History Day participant poses with his National History Day “Red Tails” exhibit during the competition held at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on April 11-12, 2018. (National Archives photo, Jeffrey Reed)

Archives Hosts National History Day

By Kerri Lawrence  | National Archives News

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2018 — More than 270 middle and high school students from Washington, DC, enriched their understanding of history this week with a visit to the National Archives, which hosted an educational event for National History Day.  

National History Day is a year-long academic program focused on historical research, interpretation, and creative expression. By participating, students become writers, filmmakers, web designers, playwrights, and artists as they create unique contemporary expressions of history.

According to the nonprofit educational organization National History Day, more than 2,000 DC-based students from public, charter, independent, and home schools participate each year—with more than half a million middle and high school students participating nationwide.

Every year, National History Day frames students’ research within a historical theme. The theme for this year’s competition was “Conflict and Compromise in History.” Students can then select their own research topic within that framework.

The theme itself is chosen for its broad application to world, national, or state history and its relevance to ancient history or to the more recent past, according to DC National History Day coordinator Missy McNatt, an education specialist with the National Archives.

McNatt said that the theme offers a unique opportunity for students to think beyond the antiquated view of history as mere facts and dates. Students are able to delve deeper through an active exploration of real-world challenges and problems into the historical content, developing perspective and understanding.

Read more, about National History Day at National Archives News, plus more photos! 

Interesting

usnatarchives:

A National History Day participant poses with his National History Day “Red Tails” exhibit during the competition held at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on April 11-12, 2018. (National Archives photo, Jeffrey Reed)

Archives Hosts National History Day

By Kerri Lawrence  | National Archives News

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2018 — More than 270 middle and high school students from Washington, DC, enriched their understanding of history this week with a visit to the National Archives, which hosted an educational event for National History Day.  

National History Day is a year-long academic program focused on historical research, interpretation, and creative expression. By participating, students become writers, filmmakers, web designers, playwrights, and artists as they create unique contemporary expressions of history.

According to the nonprofit educational organization National History Day, more than 2,000 DC-based students from public, charter, independent, and home schools participate each year—with more than half a million middle and high school students participating nationwide.

Every year, National History Day frames students’ research within a historical theme. The theme for this year’s competition was “Conflict and Compromise in History.” Students can then select their own research topic within that framework.

The theme itself is chosen for its broad application to world, national, or state history and its relevance to ancient history or to the more recent past, according to DC National History Day coordinator Missy McNatt, an education specialist with the National Archives.

McNatt said that the theme offers a unique opportunity for students to think beyond the antiquated view of history as mere facts and dates. Students are able to delve deeper through an active exploration of real-world challenges and problems into the historical content, developing perspective and understanding.

Read more, about National History Day at National Archives News, plus more photos! 

Interesting

todaysdocument:

Return of Prisoners taken at Trenton the 26th, December 1776 by the Army under the command of his Excellency General Washington

Papers of
the  Continental Congress 1774-1789, Item 152: Letters from Gen. George
 Washington, Commander in Chief of the Army, 1775-84; Records of the  
Continental and  Confederation Congresses and the  Constitutional  
Convention; Record Group 360

On the morning of December 26, 1776, Continental
troops commanded by General George Washington launched a surprise
attack on Hessian mercenaries barracked at Trenton, New Jersey,
scoring an important  inspirational victory and capturing 918 prisoners,
as detailed on this  “Return of Prisoners.”

Interesting

todaysdocument:

Return of Prisoners taken at Trenton the 26th, December 1776 by the Army under the command of his Excellency General Washington

Papers of
the  Continental Congress 1774-1789, Item 152: Letters from Gen. George
 Washington, Commander in Chief of the Army, 1775-84; Records of the  
Continental and  Confederation Congresses and the  Constitutional  
Convention; Record Group 360

On the morning of December 26, 1776, Continental
troops commanded by General George Washington launched a surprise
attack on Hessian mercenaries barracked at Trenton, New Jersey,
scoring an important  inspirational victory and capturing 918 prisoners,
as detailed on this  “Return of Prisoners.”

Interesting

todaysdocument:

The 1941 Christmas Tree: A Bright Light in Dark Times

The Roosevelts had planned for a “more homey” lighting of the National Christmas tree on December 24 in 1941. FDR had directed that the tree be moved from the Ellipse to the White House grounds, just next to the South Lawn Fountain.  But after the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, there was some doubt that the ceremony would take place at all. With firm backing from the President, the tree-lighting went forward, and thousands came to the White House to share a bright moment of hope during dark and uncertain times. 

Roosevelt addresses the crowd at the Christmas tree lighting ceremony
from the White House South Portico on December 24, 1941. Churchill can
be seen on the right. (FDR Presidential Library) 

Plans for this “more homey” event had been set in motion the previous December. A few days before the ceremony, the Roosevelts had an idea. At the 1940 tree-lighting ceremony, FDR raised the issue to the crowds gathered on the Ellipse, “Next year the celebration must take place on the South End of the White House, where all can see the tree,” and “all you good people” would be invited to the gardens of the Executive Mansion to hear the President deliver his message.

A few months later, FDR wrote a memo to Col. Edward Starling,  the
head of the Secret Service detail: “I was not fooling and I think the
proper place for the tree is right next to the fence at the south end of
the White House grounds.”

The 1941 Christmas Tree would be the first ever inside the White
House grounds. By November, two oriental spruce trees (to be used in
alternate years) had been transplanted from the White house tennis
courts to either side of the South Lawn Fountain. All was in place for a
“homey celebration.”

And then Pearl Harbor was attacked.

In the aftermath of December 7, 1941, the President sided with
custom, tradition, and his promise. An estimated 20,000 people passed
through the military inspection on Christmas Eve afternoon, with many
checking their last-minute holiday purchases outside the East Gate.

The Secret Service scrutinized the assembled crowd—perhaps grateful
that in 1939, because of the “war clouds” over Europe, they had replaced
the 3-foot-high fence surrounding the White House with a 6-foot-high
one.

As twilight settled into evening, the warm lights of the White House
silhouetted two leaders—President Roosevelt and an added attraction,
Prime Minister Winston Churchill—standing on the South Portico.

Keep reading at:  The 1941 Christmas Tree: A Bright Light in Dark Times | Pieces of History

Interesting

todaysdocument:

The 1941 Christmas Tree: A Bright Light in Dark Times

The Roosevelts had planned for a “more homey” lighting of the National Christmas tree on December 24 in 1941. FDR had directed that the tree be moved from the Ellipse to the White House grounds, just next to the South Lawn Fountain.  But after the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, there was some doubt that the ceremony would take place at all. With firm backing from the President, the tree-lighting went forward, and thousands came to the White House to share a bright moment of hope during dark and uncertain times. 

Roosevelt addresses the crowd at the Christmas tree lighting ceremony
from the White House South Portico on December 24, 1941. Churchill can
be seen on the right. (FDR Presidential Library) 

Plans for this “more homey” event had been set in motion the previous December. A few days before the ceremony, the Roosevelts had an idea. At the 1940 tree-lighting ceremony, FDR raised the issue to the crowds gathered on the Ellipse, “Next year the celebration must take place on the South End of the White House, where all can see the tree,” and “all you good people” would be invited to the gardens of the Executive Mansion to hear the President deliver his message.

A few months later, FDR wrote a memo to Col. Edward Starling,  the
head of the Secret Service detail: “I was not fooling and I think the
proper place for the tree is right next to the fence at the south end of
the White House grounds.”

The 1941 Christmas Tree would be the first ever inside the White
House grounds. By November, two oriental spruce trees (to be used in
alternate years) had been transplanted from the White house tennis
courts to either side of the South Lawn Fountain. All was in place for a
“homey celebration.”

And then Pearl Harbor was attacked.

In the aftermath of December 7, 1941, the President sided with
custom, tradition, and his promise. An estimated 20,000 people passed
through the military inspection on Christmas Eve afternoon, with many
checking their last-minute holiday purchases outside the East Gate.

The Secret Service scrutinized the assembled crowd—perhaps grateful
that in 1939, because of the “war clouds” over Europe, they had replaced
the 3-foot-high fence surrounding the White House with a 6-foot-high
one.

As twilight settled into evening, the warm lights of the White House
silhouetted two leaders—President Roosevelt and an added attraction,
Prime Minister Winston Churchill—standing on the South Portico.

Keep reading at:  The 1941 Christmas Tree: A Bright Light in Dark Times | Pieces of History

Interesting

todaysdocument:

The 1941 Christmas Tree: A Bright Light in Dark Times

The Roosevelts had planned for a “more homey” lighting of the National Christmas tree on December 24 in 1941. FDR had directed that the tree be moved from the Ellipse to the White House grounds, just next to the South Lawn Fountain.  But after the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, there was some doubt that the ceremony would take place at all. With firm backing from the President, the tree-lighting went forward, and thousands came to the White House to share a bright moment of hope during dark and uncertain times. 

Roosevelt addresses the crowd at the Christmas tree lighting ceremony
from the White House South Portico on December 24, 1941. Churchill can
be seen on the right. (FDR Presidential Library) 

Plans for this “more homey” event had been set in motion the previous December. A few days before the ceremony, the Roosevelts had an idea. At the 1940 tree-lighting ceremony, FDR raised the issue to the crowds gathered on the Ellipse, “Next year the celebration must take place on the South End of the White House, where all can see the tree,” and “all you good people” would be invited to the gardens of the Executive Mansion to hear the President deliver his message.

A few months later, FDR wrote a memo to Col. Edward Starling,  the
head of the Secret Service detail: “I was not fooling and I think the
proper place for the tree is right next to the fence at the south end of
the White House grounds.”

The 1941 Christmas Tree would be the first ever inside the White
House grounds. By November, two oriental spruce trees (to be used in
alternate years) had been transplanted from the White house tennis
courts to either side of the South Lawn Fountain. All was in place for a
“homey celebration.”

And then Pearl Harbor was attacked.

In the aftermath of December 7, 1941, the President sided with
custom, tradition, and his promise. An estimated 20,000 people passed
through the military inspection on Christmas Eve afternoon, with many
checking their last-minute holiday purchases outside the East Gate.

The Secret Service scrutinized the assembled crowd—perhaps grateful
that in 1939, because of the “war clouds” over Europe, they had replaced
the 3-foot-high fence surrounding the White House with a 6-foot-high
one.

As twilight settled into evening, the warm lights of the White House
silhouetted two leaders—President Roosevelt and an added attraction,
Prime Minister Winston Churchill—standing on the South Portico.

Keep reading at:  The 1941 Christmas Tree: A Bright Light in Dark Times | Pieces of History

Interesting

todaysdocument:

The Peace Corps Act

…The Congress of the United States declares that it is the policy of the United States and the purpose of this Act to promote world peace and friendship through a Peace Corps, which shall make available to interested countries and areas men and women of the United States qualified for service abroad and willing to serve, under conditions of hardship if necessary, to help the people of such countries and areas in meeting their needs for trained manpower, and to help promote a better understanding of American people on the part of the peoples served and a better understanding of other peoples on the part of the American people…

Act of September 22, 1961 (Peace Corps Act), Public Law 87-293, 75 STAT 612, Which Established a Peace Corps to Help the People of Interested Countries and Areas in Meeting Their Needs for Skilled Manpower, 9/22/1961.

Series: Enrolled Acts and Resolutions of Congress, 1789 – 2011. Record Group 11: General Records of the United States Government, 1778 – 2006

On March 1, 1961, President Kennedy signed the executive order establishing the Peace Corps. On September 22, 1961, Congress approved the legislation that formally authorized the @peacecorps​. Goals of the Peace Corps included: 1) helping the people of interested countries and areas meet their needs for trained workers; 2) helping promote a better understanding of Americans in countries where volunteers served; and 3) helping promote a better understanding of peoples of other nations on the part of Americans.

image

Photograph of Peace Corps Volunteer in Istanbul. From RG: 490 Selected Photographs of Peace Corps Activities (Chronological File). National Archives Identifier: 593652

Interesting

todaysdocument:

The Peace Corps Act

…The Congress of the United States declares that it is the policy of the United States and the purpose of this Act to promote world peace and friendship through a Peace Corps, which shall make available to interested countries and areas men and women of the United States qualified for service abroad and willing to serve, under conditions of hardship if necessary, to help the people of such countries and areas in meeting their needs for trained manpower, and to help promote a better understanding of American people on the part of the peoples served and a better understanding of other peoples on the part of the American people…

Act of September 22, 1961 (Peace Corps Act), Public Law 87-293, 75 STAT 612, Which Established a Peace Corps to Help the People of Interested Countries and Areas in Meeting Their Needs for Skilled Manpower, 9/22/1961.

Series: Enrolled Acts and Resolutions of Congress, 1789 – 2011. Record Group 11: General Records of the United States Government, 1778 – 2006

On March 1, 1961, President Kennedy signed the executive order establishing the Peace Corps. On September 22, 1961, Congress approved the legislation that formally authorized the @peacecorps​. Goals of the Peace Corps included: 1) helping the people of interested countries and areas meet their needs for trained workers; 2) helping promote a better understanding of Americans in countries where volunteers served; and 3) helping promote a better understanding of peoples of other nations on the part of Americans.

image

Photograph of Peace Corps Volunteer in Istanbul. From RG: 490 Selected Photographs of Peace Corps Activities (Chronological File). National Archives Identifier: 593652

Interesting

smithsonian:

What in the world is a beer comb? 

It’s not for covering up bald spots.

These old-school tools were used for beheading beers that have foamed above the top of the glass, but they went out of style, probably because they weren’t very sanitary. 

The set in our @amhistorymuseum presents a mystery: We don’t know whether they were used before Prohibition or after.



Behold the beer comb, a fancy bartending tool from drinking days of old
 

Art, Interesting

The History of the Christmas Tree

Smithsonian Gardens

What is the history of the Christmas tree? As far as common historical accounts are concerned, it all started with customs of the ancient Egyptians, Chinese, Scandinavians and other cultures that displayed evergreen trees, boughs and garlands during the winter. These decorations were symbols of everlasting life and reminders of the growth of spring, and they were also believed to ward off evil spirits, ghosts and illness.

The Christmas tree tradition as we now know it is thought to have begun in Germany in the 16th century when devout Christians began bringing trees into their homes and decorating them. Early decorations included nuts, fruits, baked goods and paper flowers. It is a widely held belief that Martin Luther was the first person to add lights to the tree. During a walk home one evening, he was struck by the twinkling stars through the evergreen trees and decided to recreate that…

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History, Interesting

Nelson Mandela, anti-apartheid icon and father of modern South Africa, dies

CNN Political Ticker

(CNN) — Nelson Mandela, the revered statesman who emerged from prison after 27 years to lead South Africa out of decades of apartheid, has died, South African President Jacob Zuma announced late Thursday. He was 95.

The former president battled health issues in recent months, including a recurring lung infection that led to numerous hospitalizations.

View original post

Interesting

PBS This Day In History: George Washington was born

280 years ago today, George Washington, commander-in-chief in the Revolutionary War and the first president of the United States, was born.

Explore a timeline of George Washington’s life, broken out into four parts: his personal life, his early military career, the Revolutionary War, and the presidency.

Source: pbs.org

Interesting

pbsthisdayinhistory:

FEBRUARY 22, 1732: GEORGE WASHINGTON IS BORN

280 years ago today, George Washington, commander-in-chief in the Revolutionary War and the first president of the United States, was born.

Explore a timeline of George Washington’s life, broken out into four parts: his personal life, his early military career, the Revolutionary War, and the presidency.