A Rare Mix Created Silicon Valley’s Startup Culture

A Rare Mix Created Silicon Valley’s Startup Culture

When Facebook goes public later this spring, its founder, Mark Zuckerberg, will be following in the footsteps of a long line of Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs that includes Steve Jobs and Google’s Larry Page and Sergey Brin. But there was a time when the idea of an engineer or scientist starting his or her own company was rare.

In 1956, what is now called Silicon Valley was called the Valley of the Heart’s Delight. Its rolling hills were covered with farms and orchards. To become Silicon Valley it needed four ingredients: the first, brilliant scientists.

Collecting Scientific Talent

William Shockley was certainly brilliant, says Leslie Berlin, a historian and archivist at Stanford University.

“People tend to collectively agree,” she says, that “[Shockley] was one of the smartest people to walk about this valley for quite a long time.”

In 1956, Shockley won the Nobel Prize for co-inventing the transistor. His next dream was to make transistors out of silicon; he decided to set up his lab in Mountain View — near Palo Alto — largely for personal reasons.

“He’d grown up in Palo Alto,” Berlin says. Most importantly, she says, “his mother was still living in Palo Alto.”

Of course, it helped that nearby Stanford University was also doing federally funded electronics research. Shockley was a magnet who drew more brilliant scientists to the valley. Among them was Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel and the man who would come up with Moore’s Law — the observation that the number of transistors on a chip doubles about every two years.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Laura Sydell at NPR.

Happy 6th Birthday, Twitter!

On March 21, 2006, Jack Dorsey tweeted the first ever tweet on Twitter.

The sheer fact that you can understand that sentence shows you how far Twitter has gone since then. It has become the de facto short message system of the internet and the favorite social networking service of celebrities all around the world.

And, with over 500 million users, it is the largest one-to-many open communication platform on the web.

However, the service’s beginnings were modest. The service started out as an off-hand project from the creators of podcasting company Odeo, and though it immediately showed potential, it was plagued by frequent downtime in its first couple of years.

Stability problems seem to be a thing of the past now, and Twitter handles and hashtags have become a part of popular culture – they are regularly seen on TV and movie trailers. Ask a celebrity how you can reach them, and the most likely answer will be their Twitter nickname.

When it comes to business plans, in the last 12 months Twitter has been somewhat eclipsed with Facebook’s IPO. The questions about Twitter still remain the same as on its last birthday: Will it go public, will it be acquired by a giant such as Google, Apple or Microsoft, or will it simply keep growing?

We’ll see. In the meantime, happy birthday, Twitter!

Source: Stan Schroeder at Mashable

My Los Gatos estate for your Facebook shares, Silicon Valley exec says

In a Silicon Valley real estate market crazed by the impending Facebook public offering, this may be worth a second look.

A valley executive says he’ll swap his 11.5-acre estate in Los Gatos for about $29 million worth of pre-IPO Facebook shares.

The owner, Ken Raasch, says the offer is genuine, although he won’t turn down cash.

“We’re serious,” said Raasch, who has lived with his wife, Linda, and four children in the palatial home for the past 15 years.

Tucked away in a parklike setting in the Los Gatos hills, the 10,000-square-foot house was built in 1989 and purchased by the Raasches in 1997.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Pete Carey at San Jose Mercury News.
Image Source: Alain Pinel Realtors

My Los Gatos estate for your Facebook shares, Silicon Valley exec says

In a Silicon Valley real estate market crazed by the impending Facebook public offering, this may be worth a second look.

A valley executive says he’ll swap his 11.5-acre estate in Los Gatos for about $29 million worth of pre-IPO Facebook shares.

The owner, Ken Raasch, says the offer is genuine, although he won’t turn down cash.

“We’re serious,” said Raasch, who has lived with his wife, Linda, and four children in the palatial home for the past 15 years.

Tucked away in a parklike setting in the Los Gatos hills, the 10,000-square-foot house was built in 1989 and purchased by the Raasches in 1997.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Pete Carey at San Jose Mercury News.
Image Source: Alain Pinel Realtors

Raytheon Sweetens Annual Pi Day Celebration for Math and Science Teachers From Coast to Coast

Delivery of pies within 3.14-mile radius of company locations nationwide and virtual pie sharing through Facebook to promote science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education.

WALTHAM, Massachusetts, March 14, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — Raytheon Company is expanding its annual Pi Day tradition by delivering hundreds of apple pies nationwide to math and science teachers at middle and high schools located within a 3.14-mile radius of select Raytheon business locations across the country, including the company’s headquarters in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Please click here to continue reading the original article at Marketwatch.
Image source: Fruity Cuties

Raytheon Sweetens Annual Pi Day Celebration for Math and Science Teachers From Coast to Coast

Delivery of pies within 3.14-mile radius of company locations nationwide and virtual pie sharing through Facebook to promote science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education.

WALTHAM, Massachusetts, March 14, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — Raytheon Company is expanding its annual Pi Day tradition by delivering hundreds of apple pies nationwide to math and science teachers at middle and high schools located within a 3.14-mile radius of select Raytheon business locations across the country, including the company’s headquarters in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Please click here to continue reading the original article at Marketwatch.
Image source: Fruity Cuties

Why I Deleted The Creepiest App In The World, And Then Decided I Needed It Back

If SXSW has produced any breakout startups this year, it’s Highlight.

Highlight is a subtle way to stalk people you’ve never met but share common interests with.  It shows who has been nearby throughout the day and pulls in Facebook data on them, including where the person works and their pictures.  It shows the person’s location in relation to yours on a Google map. In-app messages can be sent to nearby people too.

Highlight has received mixed reviews. What’s most controversial is that it only pulls information on strangers. You’re not swapping personal information with trusted friends. There’s no option to check-in, although you can pause Highlight for any length of time.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Alyson Shontell at SF Gate.

Why I Deleted The Creepiest App In The World, And Then Decided I Needed It Back

If SXSW has produced any breakout startups this year, it’s Highlight.

Highlight is a subtle way to stalk people you’ve never met but share common interests with.  It shows who has been nearby throughout the day and pulls in Facebook data on them, including where the person works and their pictures.  It shows the person’s location in relation to yours on a Google map. In-app messages can be sent to nearby people too.

Highlight has received mixed reviews. What’s most controversial is that it only pulls information on strangers. You’re not swapping personal information with trusted friends. There’s no option to check-in, although you can pause Highlight for any length of time.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Alyson Shontell at SF Gate.

Everything that happens in one day on the internet

Our daily life increasingly revolves around blog posts, emails, and status updates. The folks at mbaonline provide a snapshot of what happens in one day on the Internet.

Source: Dina Spector at Business Insider

A Day in the Internet
Created by: MBAOnline.com

Our daily life increasingly revolves around blog posts, emails, and status updates. The folks at mbaonline provide a snapshot of what happens in one day on the Internet.

Source: Dina Spector at Business Insider

A Day in the Internet
Created by: MBAOnline.com

Our daily life increasingly revolves around blog posts, emails, and status updates. The folks at mbaonline provide a snapshot of what happens in one day on the Internet.

Source: Dina Spector at Business Insider

Wisdom 2.0, Silicon Valley, California

TEDx is the best-known of the new wave of ‘ideas events’ bringing together academics and creatives, but open to everyone. Here are 10 brainy breaks…

Wisdom 2.0, Silicon Valley, California

A fusion of creative technologies and 21st-century spirituality, Wisdom brings together social media architects such as Evan Williams (Twitter) and Dustin Moskovitz (Facebook) with mindfulness gurus to explore how technology can save the world. It can be easily tacked onto a Pacific coast holiday. February’s event is nearly sold out, but there is another in May.
• 23-25 February, £173-£945, wisdom2summit.com

Source: The Guardian

Apple Mountain Lion: Why No Facebook?

Mountain Lion, the new version of Mac OS X which Apple announced Thursday, is deeply connected with the online world — TwitterFlickr and Vimeo are all practically part of the OS — but one very big name is once again missing: Facebook.

Please click here to continue reading this article at Mashable.

Original article by Stan Schroeder

Social Media Trends at Fortune 100 Companies

PR firm Burson-Marsteller studied the 100 largest companies in the Fortune 500 list and found that 79% of them use TwitterFacebookYouTube or corporate blogs to communicate with customers and other stakeholders. The firm broke its findings down by region (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Latin America) and network.

Please click here to continue reading this article at Mashable.

Original article by Samuel Axon

Apple Mountain Lion: Why No Facebook?

Apple Mountain Lion: Why No Facebook?
Mountain Lion, the new version of Mac OS X which Apple announced Thursday, is deeply connected with the online world — Twitter, Flickr and Vimeo are all practically part of the OS — but one very big name is once again missing: Facebook. With its 845 million active users, Facebook still over…

Apple Mountain Lion: Why No Facebook?

Forbes – Social Media

Most companies are horrible at social media. Even if they tell you their engagement numbers, show you their PowerPoint presentations, and use every buzzword in the book, the fact is they have no idea what they are doing. And that’s OK. The having-no-idea-what-they-are-doing part. Because no matter who tells you otherwise, no one knows what they are doing when it comes to using social media. Not now. It’s too new.

@iamsusannah is the Facebook whisperer (Forbes)

The Economist – Daily chart: the world’s richest people, adjusted for age.

theeconomist:

Daily chart: the world’s richest people, adjusted for age. Mark Zuckerberg is already the 52nd richest person in the world—if Facebook’s recently announced share offering values his company at $100bn he will jump to ninth in the list. Divide that worth by year of age, however, and Mr Zuckerberg shoots to the top.