Interesting

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Interesting

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Interesting

the-future-now:

Study says you’re more likely to live if you have a female doctor

  • A new study
    from researchers at Harvard University found female doctors easily
    outshine their male counterparts in at least one critically important
    way: Fewer of their patients die.
  • After examining Medicare data tracking
    1,583,028 hospitalizations, scientists determined patients of female
    physicians enjoyed “significantly lower mortality rates” and readmission
    rates, along with fewer ER visits.
  • According to the study, men and women’s vastly different approaches to practicing medicine likely account for the disparity. Read more

follow @the-future-now

Funny

PHOTO: Hot dog cancer billboard puts it bluntly

There is a wiener war going on and part of the battle ended up on the Eisenhower expressway.

If you’re headed out of the city on the Ike, you’ll spot a billboard between Cicero and Kostner that reads, “Hot Dogs Cause Butt Cancer.”

It’s part of an ad campaign by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.  There are billboards like this across the country.  In Miami, a sign reads, “Hot dogs can take you out of the game.”  Chicago was the only one fortunate enough to get the “butt cancer” poster.  The group is trying to spread the message that red and processed meats have been linked to cancer.  The PCRM says it was shocked by a study showing almost 40 percent of Americans don’t know what the colon is.

Please click here to read the original article at FM News Chicago.

Interesting

Photo: Hot dog cancer billboard puts it bluntly

There is a wiener war going on and part of the battle ended up on the Eisenhower expressway.

If you’re headed out of the city on the Ike, you’ll spot a billboard between Cicero and Kostner that reads, “Hot Dogs Cause Butt Cancer.”

It’s part of an ad campaign by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.  There are billboards like this across the country.  In Miami, a sign reads, “Hot dogs can take you out of the game.”  Chicago was the only one fortunate enough to get the “butt cancer” poster.  The group is trying to spread the message that red and processed meats have been linked to cancer.  The PCRM says it was shocked by a study showing almost 40 percent of Americans don’t know what the colon is.

Please click here to read the original article at FM News Chicago.

Scientific

A Quest to Understand How Memory Works

At 82, the Nobel Prize-winning neuroscientist Dr. Eric R. Kandel is still constantly coming up with new ideas for research.

This winter, he has been working on a project that he hopes will lead to a new class of drugs for treating schizophrenia. Last year he collaborated, for the first time, with Denise B. Kandel — his fellow Columbia University research scientist and wife of 55 years — investigating the biological links between cigarette and cocaine addiction. And this month his newest book, “The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain, From Vienna 1900 to the Present,” is to be released by Random House.

A condensed and edited version of our two interviews follows. As in his new book, the conversation begins with memories of Vienna, his birthplace.

How old were you when the Nazis marched into Vienna?

I was 8 ½. Immediately, we saw that our lives were in danger. We were completely abandoned by our non-Jewish friends and neighbors. No one spoke to me in school. One boy walked up to me and said, “My father said I’m not to speak to you anymore.” When we went to the park, we were roughed up. Then, on Nov. 9, 1938, Kristallnacht, we were booted out of our apartment, which was looted. We knew we had to get out.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Claudia Dreifus at The New York Times.

Interesting

A Quest to Understand How Memory Works

At 82, the Nobel Prize-winning neuroscientist Dr. Eric R. Kandel is still constantly coming up with new ideas for research.

This winter, he has been working on a project that he hopes will lead to a new class of drugs for treating schizophrenia. Last year he collaborated, for the first time, with Denise B. Kandel — his fellow Columbia University research scientist and wife of 55 years — investigating the biological links between cigarette and cocaine addiction. And this month his newest book, “The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain, From Vienna 1900 to the Present,” is to be released by Random House.

A condensed and edited version of our two interviews follows. As in his new book, the conversation begins with memories of Vienna, his birthplace.

How old were you when the Nazis marched into Vienna?

I was 8 ½. Immediately, we saw that our lives were in danger. We were completely abandoned by our non-Jewish friends and neighbors. No one spoke to me in school. One boy walked up to me and said, “My father said I’m not to speak to you anymore.” When we went to the park, we were roughed up. Then, on Nov. 9, 1938, Kristallnacht, we were booted out of our apartment, which was looted. We knew we had to get out.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Claudia Dreifus at The New York Times.