A Rare Mix Created Silicon Valley’s Startup Culture

A Rare Mix Created Silicon Valley’s Startup Culture

When Facebook goes public later this spring, its founder, Mark Zuckerberg, will be following in the footsteps of a long line of Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs that includes Steve Jobs and Google’s Larry Page and Sergey Brin. But there was a time when the idea of an engineer or scientist starting his or her own company was rare.

In 1956, what is now called Silicon Valley was called the Valley of the Heart’s Delight. Its rolling hills were covered with farms and orchards. To become Silicon Valley it needed four ingredients: the first, brilliant scientists.

Collecting Scientific Talent

William Shockley was certainly brilliant, says Leslie Berlin, a historian and archivist at Stanford University.

“People tend to collectively agree,” she says, that “[Shockley] was one of the smartest people to walk about this valley for quite a long time.”

In 1956, Shockley won the Nobel Prize for co-inventing the transistor. His next dream was to make transistors out of silicon; he decided to set up his lab in Mountain View — near Palo Alto — largely for personal reasons.

“He’d grown up in Palo Alto,” Berlin says. Most importantly, she says, “his mother was still living in Palo Alto.”

Of course, it helped that nearby Stanford University was also doing federally funded electronics research. Shockley was a magnet who drew more brilliant scientists to the valley. Among them was Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel and the man who would come up with Moore’s Law — the observation that the number of transistors on a chip doubles about every two years.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Laura Sydell at NPR.

The iPad of 1935

There’s no denying that devices like the iPad, Kindle and Nook have dramatically changed the way that many people consume media. Last year, online retailer Amazon announced that electronic book sales had surpassed print book sales for the first time in history.

The future of the book has quite a few failed predictions in its wake. From Thomas Edison’s belief that books of the future would be printed on leaves of nickel, to a 1959 prediction that the text of a book would be projected on the ceiling of your home, no one knew for sure what was in store for the printed word.

The April, 1935 issue of Everyday Science and Mechanics included this nifty invention which was to be the next logical step in the world of publishing. Basically a microfilm reader mounted on a large pole, the media device was supposed to let you sit back in your favorite chair while reading your latest tome of choice.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Matt Novak at Smithsonian. 

CHART OF THE DAY: The iPad Is Outselling Every Single PC

Apple CEO Tim Cook just showed an amazing slide at the launch event for the new iPad.

Apple sold 15.4 million iPads last quarter. That’s more than any PC maker’s TOTAL PC sales during the same quarter.

Other interesting stats: the iPad, iPhone, and iPod made up 76% of Apple’s revenue during that quarter, and Apple sold more than 172 million of these devices in total last year. By way of comparison, all PC makers combined shipped about 350 million PCs last year.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Matt Rosoff at Business Insider.

The iPad of 1935

There’s no denying that devices like the iPadKindle and Nook have dramatically changed the way that many people consume media. Last year, online retailer Amazon announced that electronic book sales had surpassed print book sales for the first time in history.

The future of the book has quite a few failed predictions in its wake. From Thomas Edison’s belief that books of the future would be printed on leaves of nickel, to a 1959 prediction that the text of a book would be projected on the ceiling of your home, no one knew for sure what was in store for the printed word.

The April, 1935 issue of Everyday Science and Mechanics included this nifty invention which was to be the next logical step in the world of publishing. Basically a microfilm reader mounted on a large pole, the media device was supposed to let you sit back in your favorite chair while reading your latest tome of choice.

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Matt Novak at Smithsonian. 

CHART OF THE DAY: The iPad Is Outselling Every Single PC

Apple CEO Tim Cook just showed an amazing slide at the launch event for the new iPad.

Apple sold 15.4 million iPads last quarter. That’s more than any PC maker’s TOTAL PC sales during the same quarter.

Other interesting stats: the iPad, iPhone, and iPod made up 76% of Apple’s revenue during that quarter, and Apple sold more than 172 million of these devices in total last year. By way of comparison, all PC makers combined shipped about 350 million PCs last year. 

Please click here to continue reading the original article by Matt Rosoff at Business Insider.

Everything that happens in one day on the internet

Our daily life increasingly revolves around blog posts, emails, and status updates. The folks at mbaonline provide a snapshot of what happens in one day on the Internet.

Source: Dina Spector at Business Insider

A Day in the Internet
Created by: MBAOnline.com

Our daily life increasingly revolves around blog posts, emails, and status updates. The folks at mbaonline provide a snapshot of what happens in one day on the Internet.

Source: Dina Spector at Business Insider

A Day in the Internet
Created by: MBAOnline.com

Our daily life increasingly revolves around blog posts, emails, and status updates. The folks at mbaonline provide a snapshot of what happens in one day on the Internet.

Source: Dina Spector at Business Insider

Social Media Trends at Fortune 100 Companies

PR firm Burson-Marsteller studied the 100 largest companies in the Fortune 500 list and found that 79% of them use TwitterFacebookYouTube or corporate blogs to communicate with customers and other stakeholders. The firm broke its findings down by region (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Latin America) and network.

Please click here to continue reading this article at Mashable.

Original article by Samuel Axon

Apple Mountain Lion: Why No Facebook?

Apple Mountain Lion: Why No Facebook?
Mountain Lion, the new version of Mac OS X which Apple announced Thursday, is deeply connected with the online world — Twitter, Flickr and Vimeo are all practically part of the OS — but one very big name is once again missing: Facebook. With its 845 million active users, Facebook still over…

Apple Mountain Lion: Why No Facebook?