amnhnyc:

This mini-monkey could fit in a human’s hand: the pygmy marmoset (Callithrix pygmaea) may look like a tiny squirrel as it dashes through the rainforest canopy of South America, but this primate is actually the world’s smallest monkey. Weighing in at 140 g and growing to be 13 cm long, it has a tail that’s longer than its body—and while not prehensile, it helps this monkey balance in the trees.
Photo: Laura Wolf

the-future-now:

Scientists just identified the mysterious creature from 2009 footage as a ghost shark

  • Experts at the Monterey Bay
    Aquarium Research Institute have identified the mysterious creature they caught on camera in 2009 as a ghost shark,
    otherwise known as a chimaera.
  • Pacific Shark Research Center program
    director Dave Ebert called the discovery “dumb luck.“ 
  • The institute’s geologists spotted the animal off the Pacific coast of
    the U.S. via a remotely operated vehicle they plunged as far as 6,700
    feet beneath the ocean’s surface.
  • But at first, the researchers weren’t
    entirely sure of what they were seeing. Read more

follow @the-future-now

the-future-now:

Scientists just identified the mysterious creature from 2009 footage as a ghost shark

  • Experts at the Monterey Bay
    Aquarium Research Institute have identified the mysterious creature they caught on camera in 2009 as a ghost shark,
    otherwise known as a chimaera.
  • Pacific Shark Research Center program
    director Dave Ebert called the discovery “dumb luck.“ 
  • The institute’s geologists spotted the animal off the Pacific coast of
    the U.S. via a remotely operated vehicle they plunged as far as 6,700
    feet beneath the ocean’s surface.
  • But at first, the researchers weren’t
    entirely sure of what they were seeing. Read more

follow @the-future-now

typhlonectes:

Octopus Eyes Are Crazier Than We Imagined

by Maddie Stone

The latest fascinating cephalopod insights come to us from a
father/son team of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley
and Harvard University, who’ve learned that weirdly-shaped pupils may
allow cephalopods to distinguish colors differently from any other
animals we know of. The discovery is published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.

Boring animals like humans and birds see color using a combination of
light-receptive cone cells, each of which contains pigments that are
sensitive to a different part of the visual spectrum. It’s only by
combining information from different cone cells that colors can be
properly distinguished. Hence, when a person lacks a particular type of
cone, he’s considered colorblind.

Cephalopods only have a single type of light receptor, which means
they should not be able to distinguish color at all. And yet, many
octopuses, squids and cuttlefish have color-changing skin that’s used
for elaborate camouflage ruses and courtship rituals. Clearly, these
colorblind animals have become masters of color manipulation. How? …

(read more: Gizmodo)

photographs: NOAA,
Roy Caldwell, and Klaus Stiefel

kqedscience:

Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage

Tiny and delicate, pygmy seahorses survive by attaching to vibrant corals where they become nearly invisible to both predators and researchers. Now, biologists at the calacademy have successfully bred them in captivity for the first time. Finally, they’re able to study the seahorses’ amazing act of camouflage up close. 

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Learn more about pygmy seahorses at KQED Science.