Interesting

whitneymuseum:

New Year’s resolution to learn more about art? Sign up for our three-week course, which kicks off this January! Art As Activism, Activism as Art will consider different aesthetic strategies that artists have used to address the politically urgent questions of their time. Learn more/sign up at whitney.org

[Guerrilla Girls (b. 1985), Guerrilla Girls Review the Whitney, 1987. Offset lithograph, 22 × 17 in. (55.9 × 43.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 2000.91. © Guerrilla Girls]

Interesting

telfairmuseums:

Detail from Savannah artist Cedric Smith’s “The price of freedom” (2016) now on view in the #JepsonCenter. #art912

#savannah #artmuseum #art #museum #painting #mixedmedia #contemporaryart #contemporary #contemporarypainting #onview #detail #pistol #cotton #civilrights #freedom #savannahga #artlovers #artlife #artist #artwork #painter (at Savannah, Georgia)

Interesting

telfairmuseums:

Detail from Savannah artist Cedric Smith’s “The price of freedom” (2016) now on view in the #JepsonCenter. #art912

#savannah #artmuseum #art #museum #painting #mixedmedia #contemporaryart #contemporary #contemporarypainting #onview #detail #pistol #cotton #civilrights #freedom #savannahga #artlovers #artlife #artist #artwork #painter (at Savannah, Georgia)

Interesting

archivesofamericanart:

We acquired the papers of sculptor and painter Charles Searles (1937–2004) in 2012.  

Searles used abstract forms and bold color to explore themes in black visual culture, dance, and music. Searles came of age in Philadelphia during the politically and culturally dynamic 1960s, and his personal papers reveal a man deeply connected to his roles as both artist and activist, epitomized by his involvements with the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition (BECC).  

This watercolor sketch by Searles is currently on view in our exhibition Expanding the Legacy: New Collections on African American Art on view in DC through March 21. 

Interesting

natgeoyourshot:

Top Shot: Dreamscape

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen. The Daily Dozen is 12 photos chosen by the Your Shot editors each day from thousands of recent uploads. Our community has the chance to vote for their favorite from the selection.

Your Shot photographer Albert Dros found himself witnessing a beautiful morning scene in the Netherlands. “In August the Netherlands turns into a purple dreamscape,” said Dros. “Especially during the misty mornings when the mist brings a magic atmosphere to the scene.” Photograph by Albert Dros

Interesting

geekynerfherder:

‘The Shining’ inspired ‘The Awakening of Jack’ by Nikita Kaun.

24" x 36" 4 colour double sided screenprints, in a Regular TIMED edition on specialist orange paper in a limited of 95 for £42 with the Hotel Carpet pattern on the reverse, and a Variant on specialist purple paper in a limited edition of 55 for £47 with the Room 237 Carpet pattern on the reverse.

The timed release period is until Thursday October 6 at 6pm UK, or if the limit of 95 is met sooner.

Go here to buy.

Interesting

geekynerfherder:

‘The Shining’ inspired ‘The Awakening of Jack’ by Nikita Kaun.

24" x 36" 4 colour double sided screenprints, in a Regular TIMED edition on specialist orange paper in a limited of 95 for £42 with the Hotel Carpet pattern on the reverse, and a Variant on specialist purple paper in a limited edition of 55 for £47 with the Room 237 Carpet pattern on the reverse.

The timed release period is until Thursday October 6 at 6pm UK, or if the limit of 95 is met sooner.

Go here to buy.

Interesting

npr:

We’re not going to bury the lead here: Bob Ross’ hair was actually straight. Just ask his longtime business partner Annette Kowalski, who knew Ross better than anyone — he had just gotten out of the Air Force, and was unsuccessfully trying to make a living as a painter, she says.

“He got this bright idea that he could save money on haircuts. So he let his hair grow, he got a perm, and decided he would never need a haircut again,” Kowalski explains.

Before he could change it back, though, the perm became his company’s logo — Ross hated it. “He could never, ever, ever change his hair, and he was so mad about that,” Kowalski says. “He got tired of that curly hair.”

But viewers never got tired of Ross or his show The Joy of Painting. With his soft, hypnotic voice, he’d bring his viewers in close as he created 30-minute masterpieces — distant mountain ranges, seascapes, forest scenes, always with those happy little trees. He’d sling his palette around, blend the titanium white paint, whisper about his life in Alaska, then gently tap his fan brush to create a canvas full of fluffy clouds. With his partly unbuttoned chambray shirt, his halo of tight curls and his soothing demeanor, Ross was a fixture on PBS.

Re-watching the show decades later — it’s now streaming on Netflix — The Joy of Painting still feels like a personal art lesson. And yet the oil painter we spent so many hours with remains a mystery. Ross led a private life and did only a few interviews during his career.

The Real Bob Ross: Meet The Meticulous Artist Behind Those Happy Trees

Photos: Bob Ross Inc.