todaysdocument:

Return of Prisoners taken at Trenton the 26th, December 1776 by the Army under the command of his Excellency General Washington

Papers of
the  Continental Congress 1774-1789, Item 152: Letters from Gen. George
 Washington, Commander in Chief of the Army, 1775-84; Records of the  
Continental and  Confederation Congresses and the  Constitutional  
Convention; Record Group 360

On the morning of December 26, 1776, Continental
troops commanded by General George Washington launched a surprise
attack on Hessian mercenaries barracked at Trenton, New Jersey,
scoring an important  inspirational victory and capturing 918 prisoners,
as detailed on this  “Return of Prisoners.”

todaysdocument:

Return of Prisoners taken at Trenton the 26th, December 1776 by the Army under the command of his Excellency General Washington

Papers of
the  Continental Congress 1774-1789, Item 152: Letters from Gen. George
 Washington, Commander in Chief of the Army, 1775-84; Records of the  
Continental and  Confederation Congresses and the  Constitutional  
Convention; Record Group 360

On the morning of December 26, 1776, Continental
troops commanded by General George Washington launched a surprise
attack on Hessian mercenaries barracked at Trenton, New Jersey,
scoring an important  inspirational victory and capturing 918 prisoners,
as detailed on this  “Return of Prisoners.”

montanabohemian:

UNDAUNTED:  RARE AND CLASSIC PHOTOS OF MLK AND THE FREEDOM RIDERS, 1961

It’s mid-spring, 1961.  In the kitchen of a safe house in Montgomery, Ala., Martin Luther King Jr. is tense.  In the house with the 32-year-old civil rights leader are 17 students — fresh-faced college kids who, moved by King’s message of racial equality, are literally putting their lives at risk. These are the groundbreaking practitioners of nonviolent civil disobedience known as the Freedom Riders, and over the past two harrowing weeks, as they’ve traveled across the state on integrated buses, their numbers have diminished at every stop in the face of arrests, mob beatings — even fire-bombings.

Right there along with the riders, capturing the mood of the movement as it swung between exhilarated and exhausted, thrilled and terrified, was 26-year-old LIFE photographer Paul Schutzer, who covered the landmark Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom march and rally in Washington, D.C., four years earlier and witnessed firsthand the courage and determination Dr. King inspired in his followers. (Filed along with Schutzer’s Pilgrimage photos in LIFE’s archives are notes from the magazine’s Washington bureau chief, Henry Suydam Jr., citing the energy and excitement swirling around King even then: “At the end of the ceremonies, a couple of hundred people pressed feverishly on Reverend King — seeking pictures, autographs, handshakes, or just a close look. The jam got so heavy that he had to be escorted to safety by police.”)

Here, five decades after the Freedom Riders put their lives on the line for dignity and equal rights, LIFE.com presents photos — most of which never ran in LIFE — made by Schutzer during that heady era in American history. Here are images charting a pivotal moment in the historic journey of Dr. King himself and in the nation-changing movement he led, from the monuments of Washington to the highways, rural roads, churches and bus depots of the Deep South.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

September 11, 2001: 9/11 Attacks

Twelve years ago today, four passenger planes taken over by terrorists crashed into the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in New York, the Pentagon in Virginia and a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Almost 3,000 people were killed. For most of us, this day’s events are clearly etched into our memories.

On the twelfth anniversary of September 11th, browse through a selection of PBS content.

Watch a preview of NOVA’s “Ground Zero Supertower” (AIRS TONIGHT)
Watch FRONTLINE’s “The Man Who Knew”
Listen to NOVA’s “Debunking 9/11 Bomb Theories”
Watch Washington Week’s “Reporters Remember: The Morning of 9/11”

Photo: The rubble of the World Trade Center smolders following a terrorist attack 11 September 2001 in New York. A hijacked plane crashed into and destroyed the landmark structure. (Credit: ALEXANDRE FUCHS/AFP/Getty Images)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

September 11, 2001: 9/11 Attacks

Twelve years ago today, four passenger planes taken over by terrorists crashed into the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in New York, the Pentagon in Virginia and a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Almost 3,000 people were killed. For most of us, this day’s events are clearly etched into our memories.

On the twelfth anniversary of September 11th, browse through a selection of PBS content.

Watch a preview of NOVA’s “Ground Zero Supertower” (AIRS TONIGHT)
Watch FRONTLINE’s “The Man Who Knew”
Listen to NOVA’s “Debunking 9/11 Bomb Theories”
Watch Washington Week’s “Reporters Remember: The Morning of 9/11”

Photo: The rubble of the World Trade Center smolders following a terrorist attack 11 September 2001 in New York. A hijacked plane crashed into and destroyed the landmark structure. (Credit: ALEXANDRE FUCHS/AFP/Getty Images)