Owner of Silicon Valley staffing firm charged in visa fraud

associatedpress-yahoopartner:

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The owner of a company that supplied foreign workers to San Francisco Bay Area technology companies is facing visa fraud charges after filing fake documents to bring people to the United States, the U.S Attorney’s Office announced Friday.

A federal grand jury indicted Jayavel Murugan, CEO of Dynasoft Synergy, Inc., and a second man, Syed Nawaz, on Thursday on charges including conspiracy to commit visa fraud.

The men obtained H-1B visas for more than a dozen people by claiming the workers had jobs at Stanford University, Cisco Systems and Brocade Communications Systems, according to the indictment. No such jobs existed, but Dynasoft could use the fraudulently obtained H1B visas to get the workers to the U.S., where it could place them with other companies and profit, prosecutors said.

Bala Murali, Dynasoft’s chief operating officer, said Nawaz was not available.

Murugan said he did not know about the indictment and was “shocked.” He said he needed to consult with his attorney and did not immediately have additional comment.

smithsonian-environment:

Wildlife Wednesday: Robins are Returning!

Spring is officially here, and that means American robins will soon begin building their nests! American robins are some of the first birds to build their nests in spring. They can produce two or three broods per year, creating a new nest for each one. It takes eggs about two weeks to hatch, and another two weeks for the young birds to leave the nest.

The American robin is sometimes called the “suburban bird” because it frequently makes its nests near houses, rather than in forests or grasslands. Robins are especially fond of short, well-manicured suburban lawns, where it’s easy for them to forage for worms. Learn more about these suburban birds from our friends at the National Zoo’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (https://nationalzoo.si.edu/migratory-birds/news/suburban-bird) and the University of Michigan (http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Turdus_migratorius/)

(Photo: Kimberly Briggs)

smithsonian-environment:

Wildlife Wednesday: Robins are Returning!

Spring is officially here, and that means American robins will soon begin building their nests! American robins are some of the first birds to build their nests in spring. They can produce two or three broods per year, creating a new nest for each one. It takes eggs about two weeks to hatch, and another two weeks for the young birds to leave the nest.

The American robin is sometimes called the “suburban bird” because it frequently makes its nests near houses, rather than in forests or grasslands. Robins are especially fond of short, well-manicured suburban lawns, where it’s easy for them to forage for worms. Learn more about these suburban birds from our friends at the National Zoo’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (https://nationalzoo.si.edu/migratory-birds/news/suburban-bird) and the University of Michigan (http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Turdus_migratorius/)

(Photo: Kimberly Briggs)

smithsonian-environment:

 Microscope Monday: Diatoms of Belize

Ecologists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center spotted this diatom, called Navicula, drifting in the waters of Belize. Diatoms are microscopic algae, or phytoplankton, roughly the width of a human hair or smaller. But though they’re called algae and use photosynthesis to get their energy, diatoms aren’t plants. They belong to a completely different group, known as Chromista.

(Photo: SERC Phytoplankton Lab. Artistically arranged)

smithsonian-environment:

 Microscope Monday: Diatoms of Belize

Ecologists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center spotted this diatom, called Navicula, drifting in the waters of Belize. Diatoms are microscopic algae, or phytoplankton, roughly the width of a human hair or smaller. But though they’re called algae and use photosynthesis to get their energy, diatoms aren’t plants. They belong to a completely different group, known as Chromista.

(Photo: SERC Phytoplankton Lab. Artistically arranged)

todaysdocument:

USS Arizona; Turrets #3 and 4, 2/25/1942

File Unit: USS ARIZONA # 3, 12/1941 – 1946Series: Salvage Photographs, 12/1941 – 1946Record Group 181: Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, 1784 – 2000

This is one of a collection of photographs of salvage operations at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard taken during the period following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  The USS Arizona was one of only two ships that were not refloated and salvaged following the attack.  Her wreck remains at the bottom of Pearl Harbor as part of a memorial to those killed during the attack.


More photos of Pearl Harbor salvage operations in the @usnatarchives online Catalog.

More posts commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

todaysdocument:

USS Arizona; Turrets #3 and 4, 2/25/1942

File Unit: USS ARIZONA # 3, 12/1941 – 1946Series: Salvage Photographs, 12/1941 – 1946Record Group 181: Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, 1784 – 2000

This is one of a collection of photographs of salvage operations at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard taken during the period following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  The USS Arizona was one of only two ships that were not refloated and salvaged following the attack.  Her wreck remains at the bottom of Pearl Harbor as part of a memorial to those killed during the attack.


More photos of Pearl Harbor salvage operations in the @usnatarchives online Catalog.

More posts commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

todaysdocument:

USS Arizona; Turrets #3 and 4, 2/25/1942

File Unit: USS ARIZONA # 3, 12/1941 – 1946Series: Salvage Photographs, 12/1941 – 1946Record Group 181: Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, 1784 – 2000

This is one of a collection of photographs of salvage operations at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard taken during the period following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  The USS Arizona was one of only two ships that were not refloated and salvaged following the attack.  Her wreck remains at the bottom of Pearl Harbor as part of a memorial to those killed during the attack.


More photos of Pearl Harbor salvage operations in the @usnatarchives online Catalog.

More posts commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

archiemcphee:

As part of an out of this world space-themed birthday party for her 4-year-old son, Imgur user Pedagiggle made a big blue birthday cake that contained an edible solar system inside. The planets are cake pops that she baked first and then placed in galaxy cake batter that was marbled with food coloring.

Head over to Pedagiggle’s Imgur gallery for additional photos and step-by-step baking instructions for this awesome Space Cake.

image

[via Neatorama]

archiemcphee:

As part of an out of this world space-themed birthday party for her 4-year-old son, Imgur user Pedagiggle made a big blue birthday cake that contained an edible solar system inside. The planets are cake pops that she baked first and then placed in galaxy cake batter that was marbled with food coloring.

Head over to Pedagiggle’s Imgur gallery for additional photos and step-by-step baking instructions for this awesome Space Cake.

image

[via Neatorama]

archiemcphee:

As part of an out of this world space-themed birthday party for her 4-year-old son, Imgur user Pedagiggle made a big blue birthday cake that contained an edible solar system inside. The planets are cake pops that she baked first and then placed in galaxy cake batter that was marbled with food coloring.

Head over to Pedagiggle’s Imgur gallery for additional photos and step-by-step baking instructions for this awesome Space Cake.

image

[via Neatorama]

usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

usnatarchives:

Thousands of posters were produced and distributed by the Office of War Information (OWI) during World War II to persuade the American people to support the war effort. To get these messages out, the Federal government mobilized the Boy Scouts of America.

The scouts would distribute posters to stores located on the street level every two weeks. Approximately 2,300 communities participated. The OWI shipped posters to a central distributing outlet, such as a large department store. The Boy Scouts picked up their posters and distributed them to the smaller stores.

At first, African American scout troops distributed only posters with African American themes. For instance, the poster featuring Dorie Miller, who received the Navy Cross for heroism under fire at Pearl Harbor, was at first distributed only through channels in the African American community, such as churches, restaurant, and benevolent organizations.

In May 1943, Jacques DunLany, the chief of OWI’s Production and Distribution Division, suggested that the agency might be criticized if it continued to single out the African American scouts as distributors of posters with African American themes, adding that the boys might feel “they were being ‘segregated’ or even ‘discriminated’ against.” While African American scouts continued to distribute posters to mainly African American establishments, the OWI made sure they also received the same posters as any scout troop.

Read more about the WWII contributions of the Boy Scouts in Prologue magazine: http://bit.ly/2k3byk0

usatoday:

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture’s civil-rights exhibits tell stories of courage, perseverance

Sharlene Kranz cried when she walked through the civil rights exhibits at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington.

There were black-and-white photos of people she knew. A video saluting the role of women in the civil rights movement in America.

One million visitors: Smithsonian’s new black history museum hits milestone

But it was the timeline showing key moments in that struggle, leading all the way up to the Black Lives Matter movement of the present, that tugged at her heart.

“That was a tour de force,” says Kranz, 70, a civil rights veteran who has visited three times since the museum opened in September. “So much American history made graphic. … It shows change can happen. Change has happened. Change is happening. The sad thing is we had to go through all of that.”

Read more here.

usatoday:

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture’s civil-rights exhibits tell stories of courage, perseverance

Sharlene Kranz cried when she walked through the civil rights exhibits at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington.

There were black-and-white photos of people she knew. A video saluting the role of women in the civil rights movement in America.

One million visitors: Smithsonian’s new black history museum hits milestone

But it was the timeline showing key moments in that struggle, leading all the way up to the Black Lives Matter movement of the present, that tugged at her heart.

“That was a tour de force,” says Kranz, 70, a civil rights veteran who has visited three times since the museum opened in September. “So much American history made graphic. … It shows change can happen. Change has happened. Change is happening. The sad thing is we had to go through all of that.”

Read more here.

usatoday:

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture’s civil-rights exhibits tell stories of courage, perseverance

Sharlene Kranz cried when she walked through the civil rights exhibits at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington.

There were black-and-white photos of people she knew. A video saluting the role of women in the civil rights movement in America.

One million visitors: Smithsonian’s new black history museum hits milestone

But it was the timeline showing key moments in that struggle, leading all the way up to the Black Lives Matter movement of the present, that tugged at her heart.

“That was a tour de force,” says Kranz, 70, a civil rights veteran who has visited three times since the museum opened in September. “So much American history made graphic. … It shows change can happen. Change has happened. Change is happening. The sad thing is we had to go through all of that.”

Read more here.

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