todaysdocument:

USS Arizona; Turrets #3 and 4, 2/25/1942

File Unit: USS ARIZONA # 3, 12/1941 – 1946Series: Salvage Photographs, 12/1941 – 1946Record Group 181: Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, 1784 – 2000

This is one of a collection of photographs of salvage operations at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard taken during the period following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  The USS Arizona was one of only two ships that were not refloated and salvaged following the attack.  Her wreck remains at the bottom of Pearl Harbor as part of a memorial to those killed during the attack.


More photos of Pearl Harbor salvage operations in the @usnatarchives online Catalog.

More posts commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

archiemcphee:

As part of an out of this world space-themed birthday party for her 4-year-old son, Imgur user Pedagiggle made a big blue birthday cake that contained an edible solar system inside. The planets are cake pops that she baked first and then placed in galaxy cake batter that was marbled with food coloring.

Head over to Pedagiggle’s Imgur gallery for additional photos and step-by-step baking instructions for this awesome Space Cake.

image

[via Neatorama]

archiemcphee:

As part of an out of this world space-themed birthday party for her 4-year-old son, Imgur user Pedagiggle made a big blue birthday cake that contained an edible solar system inside. The planets are cake pops that she baked first and then placed in galaxy cake batter that was marbled with food coloring.

Head over to Pedagiggle’s Imgur gallery for additional photos and step-by-step baking instructions for this awesome Space Cake.

image

[via Neatorama]

archiemcphee:

As part of an out of this world space-themed birthday party for her 4-year-old son, Imgur user Pedagiggle made a big blue birthday cake that contained an edible solar system inside. The planets are cake pops that she baked first and then placed in galaxy cake batter that was marbled with food coloring.

Head over to Pedagiggle’s Imgur gallery for additional photos and step-by-step baking instructions for this awesome Space Cake.

image

[via Neatorama]

usnatarchives:

Photographer Dorothea Lange was employed by the Federal government when President Roosevelt signed

Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. 

Lange photographed the experience of Japanese Americans, now deemed a threat to national security, as they were moved from their homes on the West Coast to internment camps.

Her photographs were kept from the public during World War II, but after the after the war ended, these images became part of the holdings of the National Archives and were available to the public. You can explore these images in our digital catalog.

The Franklin D, Roosevelt Presidential Library’s new exhibit has just opened. “Images of Internment: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II” includes over 200 photographs, including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. The exhibit is open until December 31, 2017.

usnatarchives:

Thousands of posters were produced and distributed by the Office of War Information (OWI) during World War II to persuade the American people to support the war effort. To get these messages out, the Federal government mobilized the Boy Scouts of America.

The scouts would distribute posters to stores located on the street level every two weeks. Approximately 2,300 communities participated. The OWI shipped posters to a central distributing outlet, such as a large department store. The Boy Scouts picked up their posters and distributed them to the smaller stores.

At first, African American scout troops distributed only posters with African American themes. For instance, the poster featuring Dorie Miller, who received the Navy Cross for heroism under fire at Pearl Harbor, was at first distributed only through channels in the African American community, such as churches, restaurant, and benevolent organizations.

In May 1943, Jacques DunLany, the chief of OWI’s Production and Distribution Division, suggested that the agency might be criticized if it continued to single out the African American scouts as distributors of posters with African American themes, adding that the boys might feel “they were being ‘segregated’ or even ‘discriminated’ against.” While African American scouts continued to distribute posters to mainly African American establishments, the OWI made sure they also received the same posters as any scout troop.

Read more about the WWII contributions of the Boy Scouts in Prologue magazine: http://bit.ly/2k3byk0

usatoday:

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture’s civil-rights exhibits tell stories of courage, perseverance

Sharlene Kranz cried when she walked through the civil rights exhibits at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington.

There were black-and-white photos of people she knew. A video saluting the role of women in the civil rights movement in America.

One million visitors: Smithsonian’s new black history museum hits milestone

But it was the timeline showing key moments in that struggle, leading all the way up to the Black Lives Matter movement of the present, that tugged at her heart.

“That was a tour de force,” says Kranz, 70, a civil rights veteran who has visited three times since the museum opened in September. “So much American history made graphic. … It shows change can happen. Change has happened. Change is happening. The sad thing is we had to go through all of that.”

Read more here.

usatoday:

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture’s civil-rights exhibits tell stories of courage, perseverance

Sharlene Kranz cried when she walked through the civil rights exhibits at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington.

There were black-and-white photos of people she knew. A video saluting the role of women in the civil rights movement in America.

One million visitors: Smithsonian’s new black history museum hits milestone

But it was the timeline showing key moments in that struggle, leading all the way up to the Black Lives Matter movement of the present, that tugged at her heart.

“That was a tour de force,” says Kranz, 70, a civil rights veteran who has visited three times since the museum opened in September. “So much American history made graphic. … It shows change can happen. Change has happened. Change is happening. The sad thing is we had to go through all of that.”

Read more here.

usatoday:

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture’s civil-rights exhibits tell stories of courage, perseverance

Sharlene Kranz cried when she walked through the civil rights exhibits at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington.

There were black-and-white photos of people she knew. A video saluting the role of women in the civil rights movement in America.

One million visitors: Smithsonian’s new black history museum hits milestone

But it was the timeline showing key moments in that struggle, leading all the way up to the Black Lives Matter movement of the present, that tugged at her heart.

“That was a tour de force,” says Kranz, 70, a civil rights veteran who has visited three times since the museum opened in September. “So much American history made graphic. … It shows change can happen. Change has happened. Change is happening. The sad thing is we had to go through all of that.”

Read more here.

todaysdocument:

Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens: Part 1 – A Challenge to Democracy

Americanism … loses much of its meaning in the confines of a Relocation Center.

A Challenge to Democracy (1943)

February 19, 2017, is the 75th Anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066. Issued in 1942, soon after the United States’ entry into the Second World War, EO 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded” and “provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary … to accomplish the purpose of this order.”

Though the text of EO 9066 does not contain the word “Japanese,” the intent and effect was the creation of a sweeping program to remove 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes in coastal California, Oregon, and Washington State in the name of national security. Though the language of the time called this an “evacuation” or “mass migration,” those affected were forced to leave their communities as the Federal government moved them to heavily-guarded camps in isolated areas hundreds of miles away.

The Film Record

The newly-created War Relocation Authority (WRA) heavily documented the government’s program of Japanese American incarceration from 1942 through 1945, so we have many opportunities to understand how the camps looked, how they were laid out, and what the Federal government said about them.

The WRA collaborated with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the Office of War Information (OWI), the War Department, and the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry to make films intended for several different audiences. The films are most definitely propaganda, but they reveal points of tension between the actions of the government and the democratic ideals the nation was fighting a war to defend.

A Challenge to Democracy

A Challenge to Democracy was produced by the WRA with the cooperation of the OWI and OSS. It is the most comprehensive United States government propaganda film about the Japanese American internment and relocation program. The narrator states that what we are witnessing is “evacuation” of Japanese Americans to “wartime communities” or “relocation centers” and insists that “they are not prisoners, they are not internees.” The images in the film tell a different story.

At one point, the narrator states “relocation centers are not normal and probably never can be.” In fact, the government’s longer-term plan was to move the Japanese Americans deemed loyal into towns and cities in the interior of the United States. A Challenge to Democracy likely was directed towards the Caucasian residents of these communities in an attempt to make them more accepting of displaced Japanese Americans. 

More via Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens | The Unwritten Record


Explore more resources from @usnatarchives​ on Japanese American Internment and Executive Order 9066:

todaysdocument:

Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens: Part 1 – A Challenge to Democracy

Americanism … loses much of its meaning in the confines of a Relocation Center.

A Challenge to Democracy (1943)

February 19, 2017, is the 75th Anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066. Issued in 1942, soon after the United States’ entry into the Second World War, EO 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded” and “provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary … to accomplish the purpose of this order.”

Though the text of EO 9066 does not contain the word “Japanese,” the intent and effect was the creation of a sweeping program to remove 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes in coastal California, Oregon, and Washington State in the name of national security. Though the language of the time called this an “evacuation” or “mass migration,” those affected were forced to leave their communities as the Federal government moved them to heavily-guarded camps in isolated areas hundreds of miles away.

The Film Record

The newly-created War Relocation Authority (WRA) heavily documented the government’s program of Japanese American incarceration from 1942 through 1945, so we have many opportunities to understand how the camps looked, how they were laid out, and what the Federal government said about them.

The WRA collaborated with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the Office of War Information (OWI), the War Department, and the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry to make films intended for several different audiences. The films are most definitely propaganda, but they reveal points of tension between the actions of the government and the democratic ideals the nation was fighting a war to defend.

A Challenge to Democracy

A Challenge to Democracy was produced by the WRA with the cooperation of the OWI and OSS. It is the most comprehensive United States government propaganda film about the Japanese American internment and relocation program. The narrator states that what we are witnessing is “evacuation” of Japanese Americans to “wartime communities” or “relocation centers” and insists that “they are not prisoners, they are not internees.” The images in the film tell a different story.

At one point, the narrator states “relocation centers are not normal and probably never can be.” In fact, the government’s longer-term plan was to move the Japanese Americans deemed loyal into towns and cities in the interior of the United States. A Challenge to Democracy likely was directed towards the Caucasian residents of these communities in an attempt to make them more accepting of displaced Japanese Americans. 

More via Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens | The Unwritten Record


Explore more resources from @usnatarchives​ on Japanese American Internment and Executive Order 9066:

phillyarchives:

Early Civil Rights Movement in Maryland

Case files dating from Maryland’s Reconstruction era provide great insight into some of the earliest efforts of African Americans in the fight for civil rights and equality after the Civil War. The Civil Rights Act of 1866, and subsequently the Civil Rights Act of 1875, were tested and shaped through court rulings, an example of which is the case of John W. Fields vs. The Baltimore City Passenger Rail Road Company. This case from our holdings provides a glimpse into the history of the Early Civil Rights Movement.

In the 1860s and 1870s, the Baltimore City Passenger Rail Road Company enforced their rule that allowed white passengers to sit in any car, but restricted black passengers to only the cars marked with signs that permitted black passengers. About one car permitted black passengers for every three cars that permitted white passengers. After paying his fare on February 27, 1871, John W. Fields was ejected from a car which did not allow black passengers. As can be seen in this document, Judge Bond charged the jury that if the company refused to transport Fields solely because he was black, he should be awarded damages. The jury ruled in Fields’ favor, resulting in a victory for African Americans in the fight for equal rights after the Civil War. According to some historians, this case facilitated the end of segregation on trolleys in Baltimore for a period, as many trolley companies found it too expensive to provide separate but equal accommodations for African Americans and white passengers.

Maryland’s status as a border state presents a unique perspective on Reconstruction politics and policies. Cases in our holdings cover a wide range of civil rights cases, challenging segregation and discrimination on trains, the right to testify in court, and more. These cases demonstrate the complex implications of the Constitution and the Enforcement Acts of 1866 and 1875, and clearly demonstrated the hard fought battle of early civil rights activists. Additionally, records from our holdings are useful in understanding the difficult, often dangerous, situation of African Americans after the Civil War.

Interested to learn more about the Early Civil Rights Movement? Researchers can check out our online catalog at: archives.gov/research/catalog/ and make an appointment to view our holdings at the National Archives at Philadelphia by calling (215) 305-2044 or emailing us at philadelphia.archives@nara.gov.

Teachers: Interested in having a school workshop on the Early Civil Rights Movement? Educators can contact Education Specialist, Andrea Reidell for more information on how to arrange a classroom workshop at: andrea.reidell@nara.gov.

Citations:

John W. Fields v. The Baltimore City Passenger Rail Road Company, March 1871, Box 118, Law Case Files, District of Maryland, United States Circuit Court, Record Group 21: Records of the United States District Courts, The National Archives at Philadelphia (NAID: 733672) (Record Entry ID: PH-372).

David S. Bogen, “Precursors of Rosa Parks: Maryland Transportation Cases Between the Civil War and the Beginning of World War I,” 63 Md. L. Rev. 721 (2004), http://digitalcommons.law.umaryland.edu/mlr/vol63/iss4/6.

todaysdocument:

Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens, Part 2: Japanese Relocation

February 19, 2017, is the 75th Anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066. Issued in 1942, soon after the United States’ entry into the Second World War, EO 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded” and “provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary … to accomplish the purpose of this order.”

Though the text of EO 9066 does not contain the word “Japanese,” the intent and effect was the creation of a sweeping program to remove 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes in coastal California, Oregon, and Washington State in the name of national security. Though the language of the time called this an “evacuation” or “mass migration,” those affected were forced to leave their communities as the Federal government moved them to heavily-guarded camps in isolated areas hundreds of miles away.

The Film Record

The newly-created War Relocation Authority (WRA) heavily documented the government’s program of Japanese American incarceration from 1942 through 1945, so we have many opportunities to understand how the camps looked, how they were laid out, and what the Federal government said about them.

The WRA collaborated with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the Office of War Information (OWI), the War Department, and the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry to make films intended for several different audiences. The films are most definitely propaganda, but they reveal points of tension between the actions of the government and the democratic ideals the nation was fighting a war to defend.

Japanese Relocation

Japanese Relocation was produced by the OWI and distributed by the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry. Milton S. Eisenhower, director of the WRA for its first 90 days of existence, describes the film as a “historical record” of the operation to remove Japanese Americans from military areas. The film does provide a visual record of some of the economic devastation of EO 9066. We see vacant shops and businesses, and impounded fishing boats in California. The narrator notes that “the quick disposal of property often involved financial sacrifice” by Japanese Americans.

The intended audience for Japanese Relocation was not only Americans. Narration at the end of the film frames the government’s treatment of Japanese Americans as a standard to be followed by its enemies abroad and expresses hope that the “fundamental decency” of this American example “will influence the Axis powers in their treatment of Americans who fall into their hands.”

More via Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens | The Unwritten Record


Explore more resources from @usnatarchives​ on Japanese American Internment and Executive Order 9066:

todaysdocument:

Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens, Part 2: Japanese Relocation

February 19, 2017, is the 75th Anniversary of President Franklin Roosevelt’s signing of Executive Order 9066. Issued in 1942, soon after the United States’ entry into the Second World War, EO 9066 authorized the Secretary of War to designate military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded” and “provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary … to accomplish the purpose of this order.”

Though the text of EO 9066 does not contain the word “Japanese,” the intent and effect was the creation of a sweeping program to remove 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent from their homes in coastal California, Oregon, and Washington State in the name of national security. Though the language of the time called this an “evacuation” or “mass migration,” those affected were forced to leave their communities as the Federal government moved them to heavily-guarded camps in isolated areas hundreds of miles away.

The Film Record

The newly-created War Relocation Authority (WRA) heavily documented the government’s program of Japanese American incarceration from 1942 through 1945, so we have many opportunities to understand how the camps looked, how they were laid out, and what the Federal government said about them.

The WRA collaborated with the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the Office of War Information (OWI), the War Department, and the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry to make films intended for several different audiences. The films are most definitely propaganda, but they reveal points of tension between the actions of the government and the democratic ideals the nation was fighting a war to defend.

Japanese Relocation

Japanese Relocation was produced by the OWI and distributed by the War Activities Committee of the Motion Picture Industry. Milton S. Eisenhower, director of the WRA for its first 90 days of existence, describes the film as a “historical record” of the operation to remove Japanese Americans from military areas. The film does provide a visual record of some of the economic devastation of EO 9066. We see vacant shops and businesses, and impounded fishing boats in California. The narrator notes that “the quick disposal of property often involved financial sacrifice” by Japanese Americans.

The intended audience for Japanese Relocation was not only Americans. Narration at the end of the film frames the government’s treatment of Japanese Americans as a standard to be followed by its enemies abroad and expresses hope that the “fundamental decency” of this American example “will influence the Axis powers in their treatment of Americans who fall into their hands.”

More via Fractured Ideals: Japanese American Internment through a Government Lens | The Unwritten Record


Explore more resources from @usnatarchives​ on Japanese American Internment and Executive Order 9066:

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