micdotcom:

Malaysian MP says rape victims can marry their rapists to avoid “bleak future”

  • A Malaysian member of parliament thinks rape victims might improve their odds at living happy lives — might “turn a new leaf” — if they marry their rapists, the Guardian reported Wednesday.
  • “Perhaps through marriage they can lead a healthier, better life,” Datuk Shabudin Yahaya speculated, according to the Guardian. “And the person who was raped does not necessarily have a bleak future. She will have a husband, at least, and this could serve as a remedy to growing social problems.“Yahaya had been talking about statutory rape during a debate on Malaysia’s Sexual Offenses Against Children bill, which passed Malaysia’s House of Representatives on Tuesday. 
  • The bill aims to protect people under the age of 18 from sexual abuse, and allows underage victims to testify to their own mistreatment. It’s one step toward reforming Malaysia’s much-maligned laws that have allowed sex crimes against children to go largely unpunished. Read more. (4/5/2017 10:30 AM)

micdotcom:

This senator pulled an all-nighter to oppose Neil Gorsuch

  • Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) pulled an all-nighter Tuesday night into Wednesday morning to oppose Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, in which he stood on the Senate floor for 15-and-a-half hours to voice his discontent.
  • Merkley’s protest began around 6:46 p.m. on Tuesday and wrapped up at 10:14 a.m. Wednesday morning.
  • He stood on the Senate floor next to an image of the preamble of the Constitution, vowing to stand there in protest for “as long I am able.” Read more. (4/5/2017 8:15 AM)

micdotcom:

Study suggests young people hazy on what constitutes sexual assault — especially young men

  • People might be increasingly aware that sexual assault is a real and widespread problem, but that doesn’t mean everyone knows what sexual assault actually means. 
  • Adults — men, especially — are still somewhat hazy on what constitutes sexual assault, according to new data from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, in partnership with YouGov. In an online poll, the NSVRC surveyed 1,221 adults over a two-day period in March. 
  • People largely seem to understand sex without consent is a problem, with more than 80% of respondents saying non-consensual sex and non-consensual touching were sexual assault. Read more. (4/4/2017 3:30 PM)

the-future-now:

Researchers confirm that mysterious radio waves are actually coming from outer space

  • The truth is out there — somewhere. Researchers at the Australian National University’s Swinburne University of Technology have confirmed that short bursts of radio waves that had stumped astronomers since their discovery are actually coming from far, far beyond Earth.
  • The Fast Radio Bursts, or short, intense pulses of radio light, were first picked up at Australia’s Parkes Observatory nearly 10 years ago, according to a statement released Monday by the Swinburne University of Technology. 
  • According to researchers, the FRBs are “about a billion times more luminous” than anything that’s been observed within our own galaxy.But for a long time, scientists couldn’t determine from where, exactly, the bursts were originating. Read more. (4/4/2017 10:03 AM)

the-future-now:

Is your future work ID a microchip implant in your body? These workers have made the leap.

  • It’s only human, not to mention frustrating, to forget passwords or misplace your phone, keys or work ID. But is implantable chip technology the solution to make life more convenient — and would you allow your employer to implant a tiny chip into your body to transform you into a cyborg of sorts?
  • That’s a question being actively explored at a Swedish company, Epicenter, where workers are already letting their employer implant a tiny microchip — the size of a grain of rice — in their hands. 
  • The chip allows employees to open doors, use technology with ease and even purchase food without having to fumble for key cards, credit cards, phones or passwords. Workers are even hosting implant parties for their newly chipped colleagues. Read more. (4/4/2017 11:45 AM)

the-movemnt:

“We still have a dream” banner flies in Memphis, 49 years after MLK’s assassination

Organizers with the Movement for Black Lives and the Fight for $15 dropped a banner in Memphis on Tuesday, marking the 49th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in the city where he was killed.

The banner, which reads “We still have a dream,” also includes a call for residents to meet at city hall at 5 p.m. for a march to the Lorraine Motel, where King was killed on a balcony outside his second-story room.

The banner’s placement seems symbolic, too. It hangs on Riverside Drive:: Riverside is the name of the church in New York City where King made one of his last major speeches, 50 years ago on Tuesday. Titled “Beyond Vietnam,” the civil rights leader spoke out against not only the Vietnam War, but also racial and socioeconomic inequality in the United States. Read more. (4/4/2017 11:50 AM)

Owner of Silicon Valley staffing firm charged in visa fraud

associatedpress-yahoopartner:

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The owner of a company that supplied foreign workers to San Francisco Bay Area technology companies is facing visa fraud charges after filing fake documents to bring people to the United States, the U.S Attorney’s Office announced Friday.

A federal grand jury indicted Jayavel Murugan, CEO of Dynasoft Synergy, Inc., and a second man, Syed Nawaz, on Thursday on charges including conspiracy to commit visa fraud.

The men obtained H-1B visas for more than a dozen people by claiming the workers had jobs at Stanford University, Cisco Systems and Brocade Communications Systems, according to the indictment. No such jobs existed, but Dynasoft could use the fraudulently obtained H1B visas to get the workers to the U.S., where it could place them with other companies and profit, prosecutors said.

Bala Murali, Dynasoft’s chief operating officer, said Nawaz was not available.

Murugan said he did not know about the indictment and was “shocked.” He said he needed to consult with his attorney and did not immediately have additional comment.

smithsonian-environment:

Wildlife Wednesday: Robins are Returning!

Spring is officially here, and that means American robins will soon begin building their nests! American robins are some of the first birds to build their nests in spring. They can produce two or three broods per year, creating a new nest for each one. It takes eggs about two weeks to hatch, and another two weeks for the young birds to leave the nest.

The American robin is sometimes called the “suburban bird” because it frequently makes its nests near houses, rather than in forests or grasslands. Robins are especially fond of short, well-manicured suburban lawns, where it’s easy for them to forage for worms. Learn more about these suburban birds from our friends at the National Zoo’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (https://nationalzoo.si.edu/migratory-birds/news/suburban-bird) and the University of Michigan (http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Turdus_migratorius/)

(Photo: Kimberly Briggs)

smithsonian-environment:

Wildlife Wednesday: Robins are Returning!

Spring is officially here, and that means American robins will soon begin building their nests! American robins are some of the first birds to build their nests in spring. They can produce two or three broods per year, creating a new nest for each one. It takes eggs about two weeks to hatch, and another two weeks for the young birds to leave the nest.

The American robin is sometimes called the “suburban bird” because it frequently makes its nests near houses, rather than in forests or grasslands. Robins are especially fond of short, well-manicured suburban lawns, where it’s easy for them to forage for worms. Learn more about these suburban birds from our friends at the National Zoo’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (https://nationalzoo.si.edu/migratory-birds/news/suburban-bird) and the University of Michigan (http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Turdus_migratorius/)

(Photo: Kimberly Briggs)

smithsonian-environment:

 Microscope Monday: Diatoms of Belize

Ecologists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center spotted this diatom, called Navicula, drifting in the waters of Belize. Diatoms are microscopic algae, or phytoplankton, roughly the width of a human hair or smaller. But though they’re called algae and use photosynthesis to get their energy, diatoms aren’t plants. They belong to a completely different group, known as Chromista.

(Photo: SERC Phytoplankton Lab. Artistically arranged)

smithsonian-environment:

 Microscope Monday: Diatoms of Belize

Ecologists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center spotted this diatom, called Navicula, drifting in the waters of Belize. Diatoms are microscopic algae, or phytoplankton, roughly the width of a human hair or smaller. But though they’re called algae and use photosynthesis to get their energy, diatoms aren’t plants. They belong to a completely different group, known as Chromista.

(Photo: SERC Phytoplankton Lab. Artistically arranged)

todaysdocument:

USS Arizona; Turrets #3 and 4, 2/25/1942

File Unit: USS ARIZONA # 3, 12/1941 – 1946Series: Salvage Photographs, 12/1941 – 1946Record Group 181: Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, 1784 – 2000

This is one of a collection of photographs of salvage operations at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard taken during the period following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  The USS Arizona was one of only two ships that were not refloated and salvaged following the attack.  Her wreck remains at the bottom of Pearl Harbor as part of a memorial to those killed during the attack.


More photos of Pearl Harbor salvage operations in the @usnatarchives online Catalog.

More posts commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

todaysdocument:

USS Arizona; Turrets #3 and 4, 2/25/1942

File Unit: USS ARIZONA # 3, 12/1941 – 1946Series: Salvage Photographs, 12/1941 – 1946Record Group 181: Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, 1784 – 2000

This is one of a collection of photographs of salvage operations at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard taken during the period following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  The USS Arizona was one of only two ships that were not refloated and salvaged following the attack.  Her wreck remains at the bottom of Pearl Harbor as part of a memorial to those killed during the attack.


More photos of Pearl Harbor salvage operations in the @usnatarchives online Catalog.

More posts commemorating the 75th Anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

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