One Turtle’s Story

riversidearchives:

May 23rd is World Turtle Day,
a day sponsored annually by the American Tortoise Rescue organization to
increase knowledge of, and respect for, turtles and tortoises worldwide. 

Shown
here are six sequential photographs of a sea turtle being tested for radioactivity
on July 26, 1957, at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Between 1946 and
1958, the Atomic Energy Commission and the U.S. military conducted 67
atmospheric nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands during the early phases of
the Cold War. Government personnel or contractors in these photographs wanted
to gauge the extent to which local sea life might have been impacted by
radioactive fallout.

We hope the turtle wasn’t adversely affected and went on to live a long life despite the possible nuclear contaminants in the local environment!

Series: Jobsite Photographs
of the Pacific Islands, 1953 – 1959. Record Group 326: Records of the Atomic
Energy Commission, 1923 – 1975. (National Archives Identifier: 7584062)
 

usnatarchives:

Future statue, by Robert Aiken, 2015. (Photo by Jeff Reed, National Archives)

The National Archives’ larger-than-life statues

Do you want to learn more about the history and architecture of National Archives Building in Washington, DC? Join us online Thursday, May 24, 2018, at noon for a Facebook Live tour of the building’s exterior. For more information, follow us on Facebook!

On each side of the National Archives Building in Washington, DC (on Pennsylvania and Constitution Avenues), sit two 65-ton statues. Each statue is more than 10 feet high and, with their bases, tower 25 feet above the sidewalk.

They were carved from 1934 to 1935, and each came from a single piece of Indiana limestone. The sculptors and carvers worked on site in temporary structures created for them.

Because the stones were so large and heavy, they had to be brought by train to Washington from Indiana on specially designed flat cars.

image

Rough block of stone from which one of the National Archives statues was carved, 1934. (Stone Magazine)

image

Rough block of stone from which one of the National Archives statues was carved, 1934. (Stone Magazine)

Read more about the other giants over at Pieces of History. Which of the four “guardians” is your favorite?  

todaysdocument:

The Jefferson Memorial turns 75

On Friday, April 13, 2018, the memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson—our third President and principal author of the Declaration of Independence—turns 75.

The memorial’s architect, John Russell Pope (1874–1937), was also architect of the National Archives Building. While Pope lived long enough to see the opening of the Archives, he died before groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial had even commenced. His partners, Daniel P. Higgins and Otto R. Eggers, had to take over the memorial’s construction.

After Pope’s death, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission, which oversaw the project, made changes to Pope’s design to counter some criticism about the scale of the memorial and address an outcry over plans to remove numerous cherry trees around the Tidal Basin. Construction on the revised plans began on December 15, 1938. The following November, President Franklin D. Roosevelt attended the cornerstone-laying ceremony.

Earlier in 1938, the commission had held a competition to select sculptors for the memorial. From more than 100 entries, they chose Rudulph Evans as the main sculptor and Adolph A. Weinman to sculpt the pediment relief located above the entrance. Weinman also designed the pediment on the north side of the National Archives Building, facing Pennsylvania Avenue, titled Destiny.

President Roosevelt returned on April 13, 1943, to dedicate the memorial, which coincided with the 200th anniversary of Jefferson’s birth. Due to metal shortages during World War II, Evans had not yet been able to complete the 10,000-pound, 19-foot-tall bronze statue of Jefferson, and instead a plaster cast was painted to mimic bronze (the bronze statue was not installed until 1947).

During the dedication celebration, the original Declaration of Independence was on display in the new memorial. Guarded 24 hours a day by a Marine Honor Guard, the document had been brought out of its war hiding place, Fort Knox. At that time, the Library of Congress had custody over the Declaration and moved it out of the city as a war precaution.

Seventy-five years later,  the Declaration is housed at the National Archives. And the Jefferson Memorial still stands over the Tidal Basin as a favorite designation for viewing the cherry blossoms each spring.

Happy 275th Birthday to Thomas Jefferson and 75th to the Jefferson Memorial!

via The Jefferson Memorial turns 75 | Pieces of History

todaysdocument:

The Jefferson Memorial turns 75

On Friday, April 13, 2018, the memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson—our third President and principal author of the Declaration of Independence—turns 75.

The memorial’s architect, John Russell Pope (1874–1937), was also architect of the National Archives Building. While Pope lived long enough to see the opening of the Archives, he died before groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial had even commenced. His partners, Daniel P. Higgins and Otto R. Eggers, had to take over the memorial’s construction.

After Pope’s death, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission, which oversaw the project, made changes to Pope’s design to counter some criticism about the scale of the memorial and address an outcry over plans to remove numerous cherry trees around the Tidal Basin. Construction on the revised plans began on December 15, 1938. The following November, President Franklin D. Roosevelt attended the cornerstone-laying ceremony.

Earlier in 1938, the commission had held a competition to select sculptors for the memorial. From more than 100 entries, they chose Rudulph Evans as the main sculptor and Adolph A. Weinman to sculpt the pediment relief located above the entrance. Weinman also designed the pediment on the north side of the National Archives Building, facing Pennsylvania Avenue, titled Destiny.

President Roosevelt returned on April 13, 1943, to dedicate the memorial, which coincided with the 200th anniversary of Jefferson’s birth. Due to metal shortages during World War II, Evans had not yet been able to complete the 10,000-pound, 19-foot-tall bronze statue of Jefferson, and instead a plaster cast was painted to mimic bronze (the bronze statue was not installed until 1947).

During the dedication celebration, the original Declaration of Independence was on display in the new memorial. Guarded 24 hours a day by a Marine Honor Guard, the document had been brought out of its war hiding place, Fort Knox. At that time, the Library of Congress had custody over the Declaration and moved it out of the city as a war precaution.

Seventy-five years later,  the Declaration is housed at the National Archives. And the Jefferson Memorial still stands over the Tidal Basin as a favorite designation for viewing the cherry blossoms each spring.

Happy 275th Birthday to Thomas Jefferson and 75th to the Jefferson Memorial!

via The Jefferson Memorial turns 75 | Pieces of History

usnatarchives:

A National History Day participant poses with his National History Day “Red Tails” exhibit during the competition held at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on April 11-12, 2018. (National Archives photo, Jeffrey Reed)

Archives Hosts National History Day

By Kerri Lawrence  | National Archives News

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2018 — More than 270 middle and high school students from Washington, DC, enriched their understanding of history this week with a visit to the National Archives, which hosted an educational event for National History Day.  

National History Day is a year-long academic program focused on historical research, interpretation, and creative expression. By participating, students become writers, filmmakers, web designers, playwrights, and artists as they create unique contemporary expressions of history.

According to the nonprofit educational organization National History Day, more than 2,000 DC-based students from public, charter, independent, and home schools participate each year—with more than half a million middle and high school students participating nationwide.

Every year, National History Day frames students’ research within a historical theme. The theme for this year’s competition was “Conflict and Compromise in History.” Students can then select their own research topic within that framework.

The theme itself is chosen for its broad application to world, national, or state history and its relevance to ancient history or to the more recent past, according to DC National History Day coordinator Missy McNatt, an education specialist with the National Archives.

McNatt said that the theme offers a unique opportunity for students to think beyond the antiquated view of history as mere facts and dates. Students are able to delve deeper through an active exploration of real-world challenges and problems into the historical content, developing perspective and understanding.

Read more, about National History Day at National Archives News, plus more photos! 

usnatarchives:

A National History Day participant poses with his National History Day “Red Tails” exhibit during the competition held at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on April 11-12, 2018. (National Archives photo, Jeffrey Reed)

Archives Hosts National History Day

By Kerri Lawrence  | National Archives News

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2018 — More than 270 middle and high school students from Washington, DC, enriched their understanding of history this week with a visit to the National Archives, which hosted an educational event for National History Day.  

National History Day is a year-long academic program focused on historical research, interpretation, and creative expression. By participating, students become writers, filmmakers, web designers, playwrights, and artists as they create unique contemporary expressions of history.

According to the nonprofit educational organization National History Day, more than 2,000 DC-based students from public, charter, independent, and home schools participate each year—with more than half a million middle and high school students participating nationwide.

Every year, National History Day frames students’ research within a historical theme. The theme for this year’s competition was “Conflict and Compromise in History.” Students can then select their own research topic within that framework.

The theme itself is chosen for its broad application to world, national, or state history and its relevance to ancient history or to the more recent past, according to DC National History Day coordinator Missy McNatt, an education specialist with the National Archives.

McNatt said that the theme offers a unique opportunity for students to think beyond the antiquated view of history as mere facts and dates. Students are able to delve deeper through an active exploration of real-world challenges and problems into the historical content, developing perspective and understanding.

Read more, about National History Day at National Archives News, plus more photos!